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great article :hail
 

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Theirs sum great video footage of valve springs in action on this site
http://www.racingsprings.com/movies.htm

Hers a plot of the inlet cam ramp , the vertical scale in in .1 mm
Horizontal is Degrees.

http://members.optusnet.com.au/p-d/INLETCAM-2m.gif


A lash of .1 to .2 mm is between 60 and 40 degrees.
As you can see if you are running maximum lash then their is almost
No ramp left before the cam gets into its high acceleration flank stage

Given the above info and the grind profile of the cams maybe Suzuki should have
Quoted lash for an inlet cam as being .1 mm +.1 – 0

I don’t have a plot of an exhaust camp ramp maybe sum one else can post it up
 

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that vid of the valve springs is neat!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thanks for the vid link I'll look later.

I don’t have a plot of an exhaust camp ramp maybe sum one else can post it up
I have files for all the std TL cams so if you want to see plots just ask and i'll put them up. I can overlay the R and S plots over each other if u want to see the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·

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Interesting how the springs rotate :devious

BTW Stu, don't suppose you can get Nuway valve cutting heads cheap :devious

Just looked here in the UK and nearly fell off my chair :banghead
 

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its crazy watching the valve stem sway like that :hail
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
BTW Stu, don't suppose you can get Nuway valve cutting heads cheap :devious

Just looked here in the UK and nearly fell off my chair :banghead
I'll look around for you.
 
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the difference between rear and front cylinders could be oil circulation. valve bucket at the rear cylinder gets probably better oiling and oil works as damper and softens the blow. TL head design is quite nice as there is cavity next to the bucket, and that is usually full of oil. When the bucket goes down, the oil flushes the top of the bucket and there is nice new oil film for the next cam stroke.

Front cylinder exhaust side has no suck priviledge.

People are running also 10W-40 oils to the point they are 10w-30., it's better to use 15w-50.

There is also possibilities that the front cylinder bucket is getting oil under the bucket, oil and air is forming air spring. and when revolutions go high the bucket is actually starting to follow the cam and not the valve. of course this bangs the shit out of the bucket. expecially if the cap is big.

answer to the problem is, that you should do more wheelies to keep the buckets healty.:laugh

JT
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
bump for steve
 

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Yay :thumbup
 

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Naah mate.We were just talking about
 

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Thank you for the thread which made for very interesting reading (although made me feel bad about coming back from Austria through Germany on the Autobahns at speed!!)
 

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Cf
Thanks for your comments.

FYI the data used was from a std TLR exhaust cam, all components were measured using industry std devices. and all assumptions were based on a std engine.

The resolution of the cam measurements was in 1/100ths thou per degree.(using a machine similar to the adcole) ( I service the machines so I'v had access now for ten years) files were generated using CamPro. and the analysis with Dr.Dr.

I think perhaps you might have missed some of the intent of the thread, which is to dispell some common myths associated with cams valves lash and springs.

We agree on what damages the buckets but not exactly the events that lead to that .

Yes it would be very helpful to have more collected anecdotal evidence and even more useful to be able to examine some failed components and the matching cams.

What is widely being assumed as the cause of these failures ranges from grit in the bucket bore to sticky valve stems. i don't believe that the buckets presented in the threads failed as a result of these conditions.


As to the complexity of the descriptions I give the zoners credit for being able to follow the gist of the thread if not all the detail. I could have made it far more complex but that would not have been appropriate.

Hi The Ring-In,

Can You upload the pictures again? I am very interested in this experiment. :)
 
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