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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Not a huge issue, but evey time the suspension flexes (while riding) the bike squeaks. Sounds like two people having sex on one of them old metal frame beds.


I believe it's coming from the SoaS, but I can't be sure without someone bouncing up and down on it. This issue sound familiar to anyone.


I did manage to find this thread in the archives. Very helpful...
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Plenty of TLs's do this. Mine included. Usually a spray off wd40 on the soas shaft sorts it for a while.
They are known to wear the bushes and get worse till they sieze and then end up bending.DAMHIK
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Must have been caused when I took it off and cleaned it. If memory serves, there's a screw on the shaft. Perhaps it's an inlet for oil.

I'd be hard pressed to find another OEM spring. Folks tend to covet the stock TL suspension setup :laugh
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No idea what a soas shaft is...
SOAS = Spring On A Stick. The "shaft" is the chrome plated piston in the center of the spring.

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Gazza's suggestion to lube the "shaft" with WD-40 did, in fact, lesson the squeak, but it wears off fast. I will try some grease to see how that holds up. I may just end up pulling the entire assembly to lube it internally. If for nothing else other than to work on Clyde again. Been too long since he last broke 🙂
 

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On the TLS, the spring on a stick is just that.
The "body" part that the chrome shaft slides in and out of is just a cover - there is nothing inside - the only job the chrome shaft does is to stop the spring from exploding out sideways.

Better than just a spray of WD40 or the like, or greasing the shaft is to drill a 3mm hole near the top in a place that is easily accessible. - Do it with the SOAS in situ, then you know it is in an accessible place. There is nothing inside the body / cover to stop you or to escape.
Then each time you lube your chain push the little tube from the chain lube through the hole and give it a decent squirt of lube. It will last a lot longer than anything else.
I don't know if this is the same with the TLR.

I got this info some time ago from the mouth of the great Matthewman himself...............................perhaps he can qualify this practice for the TLR...................
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is a perfect example for why I'm so hesitant on making a TLR Assembly Guide for Elliott. I have over 2000 images of the TLR and its components, and yet every single time I review my archive looking for something in particular I find I have every angle except the one I need. I could have sworn the SOAS had a screw at the top for oil, but now I'm thinking it's actually the Steering Damper that I was thinking of. I have a dozen images of the spring unit, but no close up shots of the housing from which to confirm my theory <img src="https://www.tlzone.net/forums/images/smilies/motz2.gif" border="0" alt="" title="rant" class="inlineimg" />

Sorry, this was an unrelated rant. I do believe you're correct Ted. I don't recall hearing any fluid within the housing unit when I handled it. I must be thinking of the SD. In which case Gaz is also correct in that it must be the bushings going bad and causing the squeak. What I still don't understand is what was preventing it from squeaking before I cleaned it? You'd think any sort of rubber seal sliding against chrome without lubricant would squeak, but then again, the forks don't make a sound, so I guess not.

Maybe it's not the shaft causing the noise after all. Or maybe I'm just over thinking shit as usual. Damn brain [img= class=inlineimg]/forums/images/smilies/crazy.gif[/img]


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PERSONAL NOTE: You guys think my ADD/OCD is bad on here... you should have seen me trying to learn everything there is to know about Software Engineering. Oh my God... I am so sorry Professor Roark.
 

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ignore all the previous comments. TLR SOAS does not wear like an S

the squeak is in the needle roller bearings in the linkage.

Remove the linkage and check the bearings for wear

if you got them early enough its just a matter of grease otherwise they need replacing
 

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Discussion Starter #10
... the squeak is in the needle roller bearings in the linkage. ...
That being the case, I will definitely need to source a new linkage, as I was overly generous with the moly grease when I reassembled the unit.

Also, as you may recall, the pins fell out while the unit was on the table. I had to reinsert each one by hand (using moly as an adhesive). Seemed sound to me at the time, but may be the actual point of failure here.

Another possibility I'm considering is the two washers on either side of the linkage. They might squeal if I tightened the bolts far beyond spec. Which I can almost garantee I did. Then again, I lubed the hell out of those too. I'll tear the unit apart and see what I see. Thanks Stu.


Will the Rotary Damper alone take the weight of the bike or will I need to get creative when removing the SOAS?


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The rotary damper is just a damper. No springing to hold it up.
Glad stu came in. I did wonder if it would be the same for the R .
 

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Discussion Starter #12
... I did wonder if it would be the same for the R .
I knew the Damper was slightly modified on the R to allow for better oil flow at high temps, but had no idea the SOAS was different.

Learn something everyday.
 

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Check swingarm too. My TLS swingarm pivot broke. Not sure if this is a problem on TLR.
Look-up:

"Suzuki tl1000s Swingarm Failure"

On TLPlanet
 

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chops tlr arm not a problem. different construction and different load bearings
 

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That being the case, I will definitely need to source a new linkage, as I was overly generous with the moly grease when I reassembled the unit.
......
Josh, don't source any new linkages before you inspect and lube the top pivot mounting of the SOAS. :) Ask me how I know. :laugh
Years ago, I found myself in a situation nearly identical to yours. At the time, I had just had the rear end of the TLR taken apart. All of the linkages and bearings were lubed. Roughly two weeks later a squeak developed. It was very difficult to discern the source of it while sitting on the bike, but that was the only time it would squeak. It turned out to be the top pivot of the SOAS.

I never thought I would need to relate that story, but there you go. :D Hopefully, it helps you or someone.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Actually I'm still debating whether or not to do any further inspection of the SOAS. Since the day I sprayed some WD-40 along the shaft the noise has not returned.

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NOTE: I did lube the upper SOAS bearing prior to reassembly. I lubed everything on Clyde. lubed it like Buffalo Bill.


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Discussion Starter #18
There is another way to fix all of this...
Good point Snowy... Yellow paint makes everything better

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I had the same noise but it turned out the shaft on my SOAS was badly scored and had chewed out the aluminium housing it ran in. I had the shaft rechromed and ground and a new bush inserted into the housing. Stu recommended a 3mm shim under the top of the spring but that's an exercise for another day.
Cheers
Mike
 
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