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Discussion Starter #1
My Yosh header bolts are crumbling with rust. I got one out, but the other will take some time.

I'm planning on replacing both with something less susceptible to corrosion, but it will need to have holes for the Yosh header springs.

Ti and stainless are readily available pre-drilled, are there any disadvantages to Ti?
 

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I see with Google that titanium exhaust manifold fasteners are a popular option in the world of diesel engines. Is the TL much different?


A less costly option would be stainless studs with brass nuts. Then you could add a drilled tab for the Yosh springs to hang on.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks all. The SS studs with brass nuts seems to be a popular option, but I'm pretty set on the convenience of pre-drilled bolts like these or these.

My biggest concern is the Ti bolts seizing (over the course of the next 5-10 years) and then rounding them off when I try to take them out again. Probably over thinking it...

Ti is definitely more expensive, and the weight savings is obviously laughable, but the corrosion resistance for such a corrosion-prone location is tempting.
 

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Stainless studs with bronze nuts will brass nuts and anti-seize will be a sure thing. Avoid bolts, as each time you remove then, the aluminum head will wear away.
 

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Ti has an unusual crystal structure where the crystals in the metal are pyramid in shape and on a micro level this leaves the surface jagged. so they are prone to seizure

you don't run Ti threads with Ti nuts.

the brass nut and stainless stud combo is the best.

stainless resists corrosion in the exhaust temp and brass does not adhere to it.

I make a nut set with nuts 15mm long so they are more resistant to stripping out. get some 13mm brass hex and have it drilled in a lathe to 6.75mm then you can cut it to any length and tap 8mm thread in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ti has an unusual crystal structure where the crystals in the metal are pyramid in shape and on a micro level this leaves the surface jagged. so they are prone to seizure.
This is what I was worried about with Ti. I haven't had any long-term experience with extracting Ti bolts that have been through several heat cycles, and I'm afraid of trying to remove a Ti bolt that has seized. Thanks!
 

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The cost of the proper nuts and studs will out way the cost of pulling out a broken bolt from your heads. Short story spends the money now and listens to The Ring-In. That should be your only solution. I have that set up since I broke one of my stud back in 2006, for me it was cheap for me since I was working as a heavy duty mechanic and got a few from my work place, the only difference I made when I install mine was to add extra nuts to the stud so I don’t have any expose threads from the stud to get ant build up of crud.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Finally got the second bolt out!! 3 days of soaking, tapping, and trying and it finally moved. It's a socket cap screw (M8 x 25mm, 1.25tp), and it eventually stripped. When that happened I thought I was "screwed", but I managed to hammer in the next larger size SAE wrench and that did the trick.

No welding, drilling, or EDMing for me; surprising considering I installed the Yosh system back in 2004 and the bike has seen 21K all-weather miles since then.

Stainless steel and lots of coppaslip from now on.
 
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