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Discussion Starter #1
I've been reading hours of suspension setup crap and I'm still confused as hell...

The facts: 1997 TLS, Sprockets/Pipes. Pilot 2CT's on the way.
Hard sport rider
6'3" 220LBS
Stock suspension settings

What settings are you BIG PEOPLE on TLS's using out there?

Not looking for feedback from midgets riding fart can bikes....just fat arses on TLS's.

Thanks.
 

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Standard TLS suspension is way to fugged up for 220lb (some would say too fugged up for 120lb) :dowhat


Anyway, my ass weighs around 240lb :dowhat and the stock setup, no matter how much i fuked with it, was shithouse :banghead

I fitted Ohlins to the rear, and rebuilt the front with .95kg Racetech springs and gold valves :jack and it is basically a new bike. After a bit of fuggin around with adjustments she handles my fat ass very well thankyou :laugh

Even just swapping your forks for TLR forks will make a difference as they have a heavier spring than the S. As for the rear, spoil yourself and get an aftermarket shock.

Hope that helps :thumbup
 

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...+1 on the Ohlins rear with stock TLS forks resprung with .95 kg (TLR) springs and 7.5 wt oil...forged alum wheels sporting wave rotors and Ti bolts all around as well:thumbup...
 

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You've got to set it up to suite yourself.

You're not going to get a good sag number at the front with stock TLS springs, @ 220lbs you'll be needing some heavier aftermarket ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, keeping the stock parts for now, should I start by cranking the front preload to maximum? Will that "unbalance" the other settings?:confused

Let me also phrase that a different way: If you BIG guys bought a TLS off the showroom floor today and kept the stock suspension parts, how would you adjust your settings to best use what the bike came with?
 

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Crank spring preload adjusters all the way down to maximum front & rear. If you weigh 150 pounds without riding gear you will still have too much rider's sag front & rear with this set up. It will feel a bit better though, going in the right direction. Call Jim Lindemann at Lindemann Engineering & see if he still has any aftermarket stiffer springs for that rear strut. He is the only person I know that carried those stiffer springs for the stock strut. Get yourself a set of stiffer fork springs as you get the rear spring & you will find it will handle a whole lot better with the proper springs for someone of your girth installed & the rider's sag set in the "range". Getting an aftermarket damper or shock would be a nice addition as well but I think with someone of your weight the bike sags so much when you sit on it you have no chance for it to handle the way it sits. Have a friend take a picture of you with you sitting on the bike; park it next to a wall & keep your feet on the pegs & balance yourself with your outstretched arm using the wall to keep you upright. I think you will be very surprised to see how much your bike's suspension is compressed. There is very little of that stock set up suspension left to work & the rear has no travel left. I wouldn't ride a bike like that!
:scared
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Dobee...I've been reading a bunch of your setup info from other posts, and it is very informative. I will start by cranking preload front and rear tomorrow.

I took your advice and snapped some pics of me on the bike, and it looks like the engine is resting on the tarmac!!!

Just a question for clarification...when I read that rear sag should be 25-30mm and front sag should be 30-35mm, is that how much movement I should get between static sag and laden sag? (hope I used those terms correctly)

In other words, with the bike under its own weight, should it sag an additional 25-30mm rear and 30-35mm front when I sit on it?
 

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Mine's is revalved resprung front & rear & ohlinsed & is verry good .
 

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No, that's the total amount of sag with you on the bike as compared to the suspension being fully extended, not additional but total:)

BTW I would get at least stiffer front springs asap, the stockers are super soft. I'm 155lbs and find them somewhat scary for just moderate riding around town, I can't imagine how bad they would be with another 65lbs on them:scared
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks BikePilot. My fear is that I don't know what a good setup should feel like. I've always kept my literbike suspensions at factory settings, and I am just now learning that the bike setup is actually my limitation now, so I should set it up properly to have a better experience and go faster, safer.

Here I am with the stock equipment on stock settings (4 1/2 lines preload up front, etc.), doing some pretty mini Isle of Man type shit reaching 155mph, shredding tires (literally...see my "tire Technology" post) in the canyons, keeping up with the other (newer) literbikes. It sounds like I should be dead by now on these settings. All I know is I am practicing being smooth as ice with my movements and inputs...

I just cranked the front preload to full and am staring at the rear spring wondering WTF to do. It looks as though it will take a while and some scraped knuckles to get it done. I am going to use the hammer/drift, hammer/tack puller method to see what happens.

Then maybe I'll be ready to see what a ride feels like before I touch rebound and compression damping.
 

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Find a good quality metal rod that will just barely slide through the hole in the swingarm pivot area & still stick out about a foot on each side of the bike. Put the bike on a rear stand & grab a couple of jack stands & place them to either side of the swingarm pivot pretty close to the frame of the bike. Adjust the jack stands so that they are up kind of high so that when you shove that metal rod through the hole in the swingarm pivot the rod almost touches the top of the jack stand. Take the bike off the rear stand slowly & let the rod support the bike with the rear wheel just a bit off the ground. Take a few pictures of the right side of the bike around the spring on a stick assembly & then loosen the three bolts that secure the strut to the frame & swingarm. Make sure you note which bolt goes where as there are 2 bolts that are the same diameter but one is slightly longer than the other. They need to go back in the same place. With the strut removed you will have much better access to the preload collars on a TLS. Yes, this is kind of a pain to do but it gives you a good excuse to clean & regrease the linkages that go to that strut assembly! They need to be done periodically & since you need to adjust spring preload anyways you can take care of both issues. A little WD40 on those strut collars & threads will definitely help out. Crank that preload all the way down, lock the collars against each other, clean up the linkages & grease them up. Reassemble & you are gonna get that rear to feel a tad better. During the Winter think about getting an 800 lb. rear spring from Jim Lindemann. It is around $100 exchange & Lindemann can do the spring R & R. A highly recommended mod even for a relative lightweight rider (160lbs. w/ no gear) like myself...
 
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