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Discussion Starter #1
I really wanted to use the existing starter relay and update my S to three circuits;
one to replace the red, and two new lighting circuits, all in 16 gauge wire.

I didn't really want to just solder the wires to the relay. I believe in that old adage
that a solder joint is only as strong as the joint -- before its soldered. There just isn't
enough room to create a mechanical loop from wire in the relay shroud.

I also wanted to use the protective cap, if at all possible.

So, I took 1/8" brass square tubing; cut two lengths around 1-1/2" long; filled them with
flux, and slid them over the existing posts. Filled the hole in the tube halfway with
solder, displacing the flux; and cut the newly soldered posts flush with the
top of the relay shroud.



I was suprised that almost no solder leaked from the bottom of the tube.
The fit between off the shelf "hobby tubing" and the lug is almost perfect.


There was still enough room in the shroud to get my "monster" 45watt
iron with the 1/2" tip in between the tube and the shroud wall,
creating a very nicer "boiling" bath of solder inside of the tube
and around the existing relay lug.



Then I threaded a pair of #4 brass screws into the tubing, with nuts
pre-assembled, and added a solder joint at the base of the screw to lock it
to the square tube. A #4 fits inside the tube without tapping, but creates its
own thread on the way in.

After trimming the heads of the screws off, I soldered the
faces of the two nuts together, creating a sort of goal post structure:


The spacing is almost perfect for standard crimped connectors on 16g wire.


The top nuts lock the crimps onto the posts, and the spacing is such that the faces
of the nuts lock against each other.


I'm pretty happy with the result. Its WAY stronger in bending than the relay lugs were,
which should translate to better life when/if the wires get tugged. Another winter hack completed!

--frankb
 

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Nice,but never could understand what they were thinking taking the main loom feed off the solenoid.
Things used to be simple. :laugh


 

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Discussion Starter #3
...never could understand what they were thinking taking the main loom feed off the solenoid.
Things used to be simple. :laugh
I think its just a very fancy fuse block. And a "engine between battery and keyswitch"
thing. Lots of german cars do it, which forces the main route behind a firewall to the fuse
box, for safety. A BMW 2002 takes full battery capacity right through a fender grommet,
which isn't pretty 40 grommet-cracking :banghead years later!

I seem to remember Porsche had a recall in 1968 for the way the battery would tend
to explode in a front end crash on the "new 911", just slightly before the gas tank would crack.

They moved it.:)

This arrangement does create a nice "protected jack" for the main fuse, very
close to the battery junction, and avoids running an unfused conductor through the
"engine compartment" to the front fuse box ....

... or using those spring-loaded "inline" fuseholders, which I don't think I've ever seen
on a production vehicle, much less with a 30 amp fuse.

This is not "my mother's car stereo", here! :laugh I'm making new main routes out of
tefzel wire,
300F jacket rating military spec stuff.

--f
 

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Upside Down Super Mod,
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Nice fix, although I like Les' fix too. Nice, simple and straighforward.

What will you do about the starter solenoid coil connections?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice fix, although I like Les' fix too. Nice, simple and straighforward.

What will you do about the starter solenoid coil connections?
Thanks.

I'm hunting through my boxes of car harness parts for a two-pin molded connector
housing that uses flat pins. I think I have one frrom Mitsubishi for a seat belt warning switch.:O
I'll update this thread when I find the little bugger.

I also considered pouring an epoxy "housing" around the original weatherpack-style
female pins, but they are so doggoned cheesy ...

--f
 
R

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What are these "Fuses" of which you speak ???

Mwahhahahaha :devious




Seriously though, nice inventive use of brass tube :thumbup. Bit of solvent and a scrub should clean it up nice enough to pot it with some epoxy.

These solid state relays come in 80amp continuous (much higher if lower duty cycle) with the same footprint. I wonder how much current the starter actually draws ?

Using them for the coolant pump, fuel pump etc. Might try one for the starter. Nice reliable option to mechanical relays.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
These solid state relays come in 80amp continuous (much higher if lower duty cycle) with the same footprint. I wonder how much current the starter actually draws ?
A lot of litre+ class 4 cyl cars <Yaris, others> use a .8kW starter motor
<Hitachi>. Some slightly larger <Scion, etc> use 1.2 -> 1.6kW starters!

So, for a hi-compression litre bike; cold engine, oil thickened, low battery voltage;
80-100 <~1kW> amps wouldn't surprise me.

Using them for the coolant pump, fuel pump etc. Might try one for the starter. Nice reliable option to mechanical relays.
The wife's Hyundai uses a relay under the hood that looks pretty beefy and feeds
both the ECU and starter solenoid. I ordered a spare for $11 to destroy.:rant
It would be nice to have an alternative to the $60 Suzuki part!

Newark has these automotive relays that look promising for $6 each, 100A capacity.

--frankb
 
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