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Discussion Starter #21
... The problems really seem to come if there are any air leaks in a system filled with DexCool
Exactly what I told the new owner. Something within system caused it to get like that. Which could be almost anything. Hence one of the reasons it's torn apart. No sense cleaning it if it will just happen again, right? Time and money down the toilet. Two primary culprits at the moment are the blown Mechanical Seal (coolant leak) and Radiator Cap. This of course assumes no holes are present in the Radiator.

According to the article you provided... "A faulty radiator cap" can cause oxidation. Would you say this radiator cap looks faulty :lol

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I'd try the detergent flush using dishwasher cleaner as the detergent and toss in a can of methylated spirit ( or plain methanol if you can get it).
Okay, I got some dishwasher detergent and mineral spirits (only spirits I could find). Girlfriend would chew my ass if she knew I purchased something for this bike (especially after blowing nearly 3 grand on mine) but you got me curious now Snowy. Let's give it a shot.

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NOTE: The reason everyone hates DexKill so much is due to its high probability of failure and destruction. Sure it's okay when everything is fine, but how often is everything fine? On a TL? :uhoh
 

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Careful with the mineral spirits. IIRC those are petroleum distillates which isn't the same thing as methanol. Here is the UK meths is usually dyed purple ( and they chuck pyridine into it to make it undrinkable - supposedly).

The radiator is probably beyond redemption but $100 for a new chinese one isn't going to bankrupt the owner. If you set up a flush through the send and return hoses you should be able to get most of the crud out of the motor.
Apparently Prestone do a handy flush kit which is aimed at Dexcool users. Wonder how that came about? :dunno
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Yeah, the mineral spirit was a bust. First thing it did was prevent the detergent from bonding with the water. Glad I used the thermostat as the test subject and not a hose.

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I did submerge the radiator in scalding hot detergent for 12 hours. At first I was concerned about rust, but then figured the thing is toast anyway, so why not, right. Afterwards I plugged two of the outlets (top and bottom) and hit it with the hose for about two minutes. Nothing came out except a weak stream of clean water. Looked inside... crud still stuck in the fin passages. Compared some before and after images... shit didn't move an inch!

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At this point I've gone as far as I care to with it. I'll get with the owner tomorrow about a new radiator, because this one just isn't gonna cut it. First time this thing sits in traffic it will overheat. Guaranteed. Damn shame too, because I managed to ghetto engineer a tool to straighten it back to its original form 😞
 

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Discussion Starter #24
This, ladies and gentlemen, is why you don't use chain wax to lube your chains. Squirting a bit of WD-40 directly onto the O'rings every few hundred miles is all you need.

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This crap is hard as a rock. Literally having to use a hammer and chisel to break it apart.
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I wouldn't use wd40 to lube my chain, it'll last until you get to end of your drive, plus I don't think you should put it onto rubber O rings, don't they absorb the wd40 and swell up.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
... I don't think you should put it onto rubber O rings, don't they absorb the WD-40 and swell up.
No, the infamous "WD-40 causes swelling O'rings myth" has been busted time and time again over the years. But like all good myths it continues to survive. WD-40 won't hurt the O'rings (or rubber in general) one bit. In fact, I typically fill a ziplock bag with a couple cans worth of WD-40 and let all my hoses soak for 24 hours as part of my restoration process. The 20+ year old hoses on my TLR (soaked approximately three months ago) still look and feel brand new. Plus, they haven't caught on fire yet (another popular myth) [img= class=inlineimg]/forums/images/smilies/bigthumb.gif[/img]

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That being said, WD-40 may not be the best product for lubricating a sealed chain (performance wise) due to its short effective lifespan, which you mentioned earlier. Although... it is "technically" recommended that we lube down our hot chains after each ride anyway (like that's ever gonna happen) hahaha....

But yeah, I'm certainly not one of those 'give my chain WD-40 or give my chain death' types, so please don't think that. I actually have a couple cans of DuPont Teflon spray and a three year old unused can of Bel-Ray chain Wax crap laying around the garage somewhere. I just use the WD-40 because I'm cleaning the chain with it anyway and I'm a lazy fooker. For the record though, my three year old chain looks and functions like new <img src="http://www.tlzone.net/forums/images/smilies/naughty.gif" border="0" alt="" title="devious" class="inlineimg" />


In short, WD-40 or any other kind of lubricating chain **spray** is perfectly fine, but that chain wax crap... it's all kinds of bad ju ju. It's on the list with DexCool. Not just because it splatters everywhere and sticks to everything, or because it gunks up the drive sprocket and push-rod, but also because it attracts and retains every ounce of road debris it comes across. People think WD-40 is bad for O'rings.... I guarantee all the dirt and crap trapped in chain wax is worse 🙂
 

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Got me thinking too. I'm guessing that the O rings are no longer rubber the same as tyres are no longer rubber so are not likely to absorb stuff like old rubber pieces used to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
...tyres are no longer rubber ...
Hold up... You mean like, tires are no longer the same type of weak rubber they once were (now they're dual compound)? Or that tires are no longer JUST rubber, now that they contain other bonding materials and whatnot for added strength and durability? I gotta go Google this sh-- now.

After not knowing about removable spark plug caps I've become paranoid about what else I don't know.


**Update** Nevermind. 15 minutes reading about the complex composition of modern tire design is more than enough for me to appreciate my ignorance on the subject.
 
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not a fan of wax myself, I do use WD40 to clean my chain and the surrounding crap but usually finish with some proper chain lube - I have no preference - any old chain lube will do.
 
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Although my Scott-Oiler seems to have given up the ghost itself I do still use the oil on the chain.
 

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do still use the oil on the chain.

Is that the "old ball and chain" .......................... :laugh yer can't beat a good slicking down........................... :laugh
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Decided to break out the HD borescope for shits and giggles :devious


Front Piston
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Rear Piston


Upper Radiator
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Discussion Starter #34
That piston looks pretty coked up...
Yeah, it's pretty bad. Sadly the rear piston is toast. I've been at with the borescope for the past five hours trying to get a clean shot, but my scope can't focus on it. It tries. It zooms in and out, but I think the piston is actually deformed and the scope's software is unable to determine what it should focus on. I'll lay money down on those hacked pipes being the primary contributor.

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NOTE: So glad I decided to check the Pistons AFTER spending 10 hours chiseling petrified chain wax and detailing the engine :coocoo

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Any radiator shop should be able to clean out that radiator. :yes
 

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Discussion Starter #37
... did it run beforehand? What's the mileage on the motor like?
Yes, he started it after unloading and drove it into the garage. In fact, it started up faster and smoother than any TL I've ever seen. Plus he didn't use the Fast Idle, because it doesn't have one! Lever is broke off. I'd didn't hear it idling, because I came out of the house just as he was pulling it into the garage, but yeah, it starts and moves under its own power.

I have no knowledge of the engine's original mileage, and the bike's history and condition make it difficult to approximate. According to the new owner, he traded a truck for it, and that owner in turn purchased it from an auction. It definitely shows signs of it being crashed at high speed. Aside from the telltale canister rash (R side only), I also cleaned enough dirt out from under the tank and behind the engine to plant a fig tree. This would certainly explain why the canisters and tail section were hacked up by someone with apparently zero mechanical ability (and common sense), and it most likely explains why it was auctioned off.

My working theory is that this bike was stolen by an idiot at some point (gut feeling), who personally hacks up the bike in an attempt to make it as fast as his hommie's stollen R1, then ends up low-sided it on a corner due to being unfamiliar with the TLRs ergonomics. The bike gets a ride to the impound where it is processed and eventually auctioned off to the highest bidder. Bob on the other hand, likely got a ride to the hospital, and afterwards he too was processed and eventually sent somewhere to be auctioned off the biggest bidder

This scenario, while highly plausible, sadly still leaves a lot of questions unanswered. For example, why wasn't the legitimate owner contacted, and if he was, why didn't he claim the bike? And who installed the (recently new) rear sprocket and and chain, and how did they know to get a 38 tooth sprocket to match the (old) 18 tooth drive sprocket? It's possible a mechanic checked before installing it, but not likely. An experienced mechanic who's professional enough to check gear ratios isn't likely to miss a rear a baring (which he removed) with no grease in it. Nor would they have left the blown push-rod and crankshaft seals (which have been leaking for a while) in place. Short answer... they wouldn't, which means one the bike's owners must have done it themselves.


So what kind of bike owner is smart enough to install taller sprockets and a chain, but stupid enough to leave two leaky seals, years worth of chain wax, and a dry bearing in place? Not too mention the Master Link on the chain, which was barely holding on one pin, and niether were pins were mushroomed to secure it. Idiot probably tried to install it using pliers. The rear tire was mounted crooked as well. Off by nearly two bars on one side. So who was this Darwinian protege you may be wondering.... I'm guessing it was Bob, the hypothetical bike theif and confirmed idiot savant. And thus, my theory finally comes full circle and the theory take shape!


Now it all starts to add up. Now each of the bike's issues begin to make sense! The idiotic half-assed modifications (failed shorty pipes, failed undertail conversion, K&N filter, taller gearing, etc.). It seems our (young) friend Bob was a bit of a speed demon who spent a fair amount of time beating this poor stollen TLR to death trying to keep up with the inline crowd. This not only explains the modifications, but the residual affects as well (bald tires, black oil, severely clogged filter, push-rod, countershaft, mechanical, clutch master piston, fork seals all blown, wax everywhere, fried pistons, etc..).

Even the DexCool is explained. It's advertised as making performance engines run up to 10 degrees cooler than standard coolant. And while researching this product heavily over the past week I came across more pro-DexCool idiots talking about "cooler engine = More Hp" than I count. I'm guessing Bob came across those posts as well.



NOTE: If any of you were actually patient enough to read all that gibberish and happened to notice a few contradictions and scattered thoughts here and there, it's because I was literally coming up with that theory as I wrote it (on a phone) so be gentle. Y'all know how fragile I am
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Got the throttle body off. Got a bit more light into rear cylinder through the valves and managed a clearer image of the piston.

I've never dealt with cylinder and valve issues before, so my experience with these is issues are limited to research.

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Those valves look a bit toasty too :laugh

If this were mine, and in my workshop then I'd seriously consider rebuilding that motor. As it has an unknown mileage and isn't in the best condition I'd start again from scratch, replacing all bearings and gaskets whilst giving it a damn good clean. Sadly this option for a self builder would be around $500 just in parts, let alone the time cost to get a pro to do it.
 

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Those valves look a bit toasty too :laugh

If this were mine, and in my workshop then I'd seriously consider rebuilding that motor. As it has an unknown mileage and isn't in the best condition I'd start again from scratch, replacing all bearings and gaskets whilst giving it a damn good clean. Sadly this option for a self builder would be around $500 just in parts, let alone the time cost to get a pro to do it.
Crash,

The correct answer is buy a motor and put it in... then sell / rebuild that one!
 
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