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My Rectifier/Regulator wires are burnt, the outside of the wire is also melted. Why?:O
 

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Your Battery may have Shorted a cell thus causing the charging system to work DOUBLE time.. and overheat itself. But something is drawing way toooo much current. Battery is the first idea off the top of my head, otherwise i would say to download manual and start checking electrical Ohmic values with an Ohm Meter.
 

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All of them or some wires in particular?

Basically, the charging system puts out full power all the time, the reg shorts the excess to ground keeping the voltage working normally. Thus, with no load the reg is working the hardest and with lots of load its working the least. Of course, the regulated current wires comming out of it carry the most amount of current under a high load and the least at minimal loading.....

My guess would be that somewhere a wire got rubbed though and shorted to ground.

good luck
 

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FYI as well...the wires will get VERY WARM when the bike is running, but they shouldnt be melting. I agree with the battery, or it could be the regulator itself. check the VDC at the battery while its running. AT NO TIME should it be above 14.8VDC when you rev it up
 

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:stupid and...:stupid melted casing wires most of the time direct short somewhere...???...
 

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I've never noticed the wires getting warm on my TLS, the reg itself will get warm (that's why its finned of course), but the wires shouldn't be getting warm other than a small amount of heat that they may absorbe from the reg. If they are getting warm from the current passing though them then you have issues, they should not be developing anywhere near enough resistance to cause a noticable change in their tempature.

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No dirrect short, I'm going to put a new rectifier in today.
 

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Good luck, its possible that the old one tried to shut the battery voltage to ground which of course it wouldn't be able to do for very long.

BTW ya didn't try jumpstarting the bike lately did you?

good luck

I do remeber a thread where this happend to another member some time ago. Can't remember for sure, but I think it ended up being faulty wiring.
 

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All of them or some wires in particular?

Basically, the charging system puts out full power all the time, the reg shorts the excess to ground keeping the voltage working normally. Thus, with no load the reg is working the hardest and with lots of load its working the least. Of course, the regulated current wires comming out of it carry the most amount of current under a high load and the least at minimal loading.....

My guess would be that somewhere a wire got rubbed though and shorted to ground.

good luck
Wrong.

Modern regulators use TRIACs or SCRs to regulate the duty cycle of the waveform to PASS the amount of current (number of coulombs of electrons) needed to achieve the target voltage actross the load resistance. There is no "shunting of excess to ground" and when no charging is needed and no current needs to pass to the battery then the 3-phase AC alternator sees VERY high impedance, not low: it is not shorted to ground, it's an open circuit. These are similar to other PWM regulators, which are among the most efficient regulators (though alternators that regulate a field coil can be even more efficient). If they shunted to ground that would be phoenomenally stupid, since the alternator would be running balls-out all the time and always laoding the engine the max it could, robbing valuable horsepower and turnign it into heat, and the left side alternator cover would always be burning hot, much hotter than it is, and the regulator itself would be burning hot all the time.
 

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Wrong.

Modern regulators use TRIACs or SCRs to regulate the duty cycle of the waveform to PASS the amount of current (number of coulombs of electrons) needed to achieve the target voltage actross the load resistance. There is no "shunting of excess to ground" and when no charging is needed and no current needs to pass to the battery then the 3-phase AC alternator sees VERY high impedance, not low: it is not shorted to ground, it's an open circuit. These are similar to other PWM regulators, which are among the most efficient regulators (though alternators that regulate a field coil can be even more efficient). If they shunted to ground that would be phoenomenally stupid, since the alternator would be running balls-out all the time and always laoding the engine the max it could, robbing valuable horsepower and turnign it into heat, and the left side alternator cover would always be burning hot, much hotter than it is, and the regulator itself would be burning hot all the time.
Umm you're wrong cyclecamper. :bitchslap

Our bikes use a permanent magnet alternator. The stator coils are shorted to to shunt excess current. They work at 100%. The higher the load on the electrical system the kinder it is to the regulator as it has to shunt less.

This is why it is important when jump starting to use a vehicle that is not running. If it is running and holding the voltage above the regulator setpoint the regulator has to shunt 100%, it wont like that for long.

edit: Have a look at the circuit diagram for the regulator on pages 7-5, read the description too. But don't just trust the Suzuki manual, google it and you'll find it's how permanent magent alternators regulate.
 

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Umm you're wrong cyclecamper. :bitchslap

Our bikes use a permanent magnet alternator. The stator coils are shorted to to shunt excess current. They work at 100%. The higher the load on the electrical system the kinder it is to the regulator as it has to shunt less.

This is why it is important when jump starting to use a vehicle that is not running. If it is running and holding the voltage above the regulator setpoint the regulator has to shunt 100%, it wont like that for long.

edit: Have a look at the circuit diagram for the regulator on pages 7-5, read the description too. But don't just trust the Suzuki manual, google it and you'll find it's how permanent magent alternators regulate.

...Steve so is it ok to use a battery jumper pack to jump start a motorcycle?

Never done it, just would like to know...
 

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It would be safe Jeff.

If in doubt, just remove whatever is doing the jumping as soon as the bike fires.
 

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My Rectifier/Regulator did the same thing, started it and smoke was pissing out from under the hump by the time i made it to the corner.

I dont know why.

I changed it over to a new (second hand one) and it's been fine ever since.
 

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did you look for a bad connection in the connector? I had a simular prob and found it had been croaded and caused a hot spot. cleaned them and all was well
 

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i had a very similar thing on my TLR. wires to the r/r got extrmely hot and the battery would not always charge as it is supposed to. got rid of the problem only when i replaced the main wiring harness. cost about $100 and an hour or so of my time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I replaced the rectifier and and rode it yesterday, no hot wires, just warm. motor ran alot smoother also.
 
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