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Discussion Starter #1
This is just a draft, so feel free to add input and images.
 

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I got some more images if you want them Josh?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ten minutes! You couldn't wait 10 more minutes!! :rant
 

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Discussion Starter #4
==========PUSH-ROD AND COUNTERSHAFT SEAL REPLACEMENT FOR TL1000R =============

WHAT YOU'LL NEED
#34 2003 Suzuki SV1000 RETAINER, DRIVE SHAFT OIL (24751-06G00)
#35 2003 Suzuki SV1000 SEAL (6X34X10.5) (09283-06008) [Recommend buying two]
#19 2000 Suzuki TL1000R ROD, CLUTCH PUSH LH (23111-24A01)
#25A 200 Suzuki TL1000R COVER, DUST (23166-02F20)
#28 2000 Suzuki TL1000R SEAL, DRIVE SHAFT (09283-38020) [Recommend buying two]
#44 2000 Suzuki TL1000R O RING (D:2.4,ID:23.7) (09280-24010)

---- Rear Tire Stand
---- Impact Wrench or Breaker Bar (Drive Sprocket)
---- Shop Rags
---- Grease (Rear Axle, Push-Rod)
---- 2 .5 inch Wood screws (Countershaft Seal removal)
---- 1 quart motor oil (coating seals)
---- 1 can WD-40 (when is this not needed)
---- 4 can Degreaser (For cleaning your nasty ass bike)
---- Hammer (for when it's time)
---- Allen Wrenches (various sizes)
---- Ratchet
---- Sockets: 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 27mm 32mm sockets (pending confirmation of sizes)
---- Screw Drivers: Flathead, Phillips
---- Boxed End Wrenches
---- Other shit...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
REMOVE FAIRINGS

Remove Plastic



Plastic Removed


NOTE: More images coming (while I fix my speedometer and tachometer)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
REMOVE REAR TIRE

Place tire on stand. Take this time to clean the rim and chain to make work easier.


Remove Cotter Pin


Remove Axle Nut. Uses 27mm socket (confirm) or use wrench from OEM Tool bag (shown)


Brake Caliper


Remove Brake Caliper bolts x2 with 12mm socket (confirm)



Rear Torque Link and Brake Caliper will drop down (may require help)


Reinsert Break Caliper bolts for organization


Push Rear Axle through with thumb (note position of Chain Adjusters)


Pull Rear Axle out


Rear Caliper Bracket will fall)



Remove chain from Rear Sprocket(pain in the ass)


(Rear sprocket Drum may come apart. It's fine)


Reassemble the axle for organization
 

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Discussion Starter #7
EXPOSE DRIVE SPROCKET

Exposing the Drive Sprocket


Disconnect Gear Shift Link Rod using 7mm wrench (confirm)


Camshaft Position Sensor


Remove Camshaft Position Sensor using Allen Wrench #??? (Put bolt back in afterwards)


Remove Clutch Release Cylinder bolts x2


Inspect Clutch Release Cylinder for dirt and debris (due to missing dust cover)


Clean Clutch Release Cylinder if dirty


Install Dust Cover


Remove Engine Sprocket Cover bolts x3


Place bolts in Engine Sprocket Cover


Remove Push Rod
 

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Discussion Starter #8
REMOVE DRIVE SPROCKET


CAUTION: Multiple oil galleries under pressure. Never run bike while Drive Sprocket is removed. All oil will flood out within 20 seconds.



Drive Sprocket


Ensure bike is in gear


Remove Nut Retention Bolt using Allen Wrench # ???


Remove Drive Sprocket Nut using 32mm Socket (confirm) and Impact Wrench


Note how the sprocket and spacer go


Remove Drive Shaft Retainer bolts x2 using Allen Wrench #???


May need leverage to remove Retainer bolts


Reposition chain for Drive Shaft Retainer removal


Remove Drive Shaft Retainer by pulling out and up


Remove Sprocket Spacer (pull)


(Pull harder) If it won't budge, use a rubber dishwashing glove for grip. DO NOT USE TOOLS TO PRY IT OUT!


Countershaft Seal is exposed


Countershaft Seal alt. view.




REPLACE PUSH ROD SEAL

Clean Area around Push-Rod Seal


Remove Seal. Insert small Allen Wrench into seal orifice (like a hook) and Pliers for easy removal


Move chain for clear view and access to seal orifice


Visually inspect seal orifice for dirt, metal burrs, deformities, etc.


Physically inspect seal orifice for dirt, metal burrs, deformities, etc.


New Seal - Apply a light coat of motor oil to the inside and outer rim of the seal.


Place seal flush into seal orifice, but don't push it in


Use hammer and large socket to gently tap seal evenly into place
CAUTION: There is nothing to prevent the seal from going too far. Go slow!


Seal should be flush with the outer orifice lip. If not, seal may not hold.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
REPLACE COUNTERSHAFT SEAL

Clean area around Countershaft Seal prior to removal


Carefully screw in 2 wood screws (no more than 1/4 inch). Use pliers to grab screws seal
CAUTION: Be very careful here. Behind the seal is the Countershaft Bearing. If the screws go in too far they can damage it, and then you'll need to remove the engine to replace it.


Apply pressure evenly until seal is removed


Image of Countershaft Bearing behind Seal


Clean area thoroughly. Visually & physically inspect area for dirt, metal burrs, etc.


Use Q-Tips and WD-40 to clean the grooves


Metal burrs can be seen along the inside edge of the seal orifice. A fine grain sandpaper (200+) can be used to smooth out any defects.


EXAMPLE: This what happens when screws go too far


Inspect new seal for damage


Apply motor oil along the inner side of seal. Coat the entire thing. (New seal should come with inner spring. If not, use spring from old seal)


Place seal flush into seal orifice. Use hammer and 32mm socket (confirm) to evenly install seal


CAUTION:There are holes along the countershaft which allow oil under pressure to escape. Do not push seal in so far that it covers these.


Seal should be flush with the outside of case.


RESTORE DRIVE SPROCKET
Clean the Drive Sprocket Spacer


Remove old O-Ring from Spacer


Apply grease (or motor oil) to new O-Ring. Insert new O-Ring into Sprocket Spacer


Move chain to expose workspace


Insert Drive Sprocket Spacer Carefully, so as to not rub new O-Ring against shaft grooves


Restore the Drive Shafter Retainer


Restore Retainer Screws


Restore Drive Sprocket


Restore Drive Sprocket Spacer


Restore Drive Sprocket Nut using 32mm socket (confirm)


Restore Drive Sprocket Nut Retention Bolt


Coat Push Rod with grease or motor oil and carefully insert into seal
 

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Discussion Starter #10
REASSEMBLE

Restore Engine Sprocket Cover


Restore Clutch Release Cylinder. NOTE: May need to depress the cylinder (by hand) before reinserting it


Restore Camshaft Position Sensor


Restore Gear Shift Link Rod


Restore Rear Tire (in reverse order of disassembly)


Restore Plastics (in reverse order of disassembly)


NOTE: More images and details to be inserted



MISC. UNORGANIZED INFORMATION

SUGGESTION: Take this time to clean the following: rim, inner swing arm, fender, and whatever else your nasty as has been neglecting
SUGGESTION: Tighten all bolts around clutch cover (08mm)
SUGGESTION: Check Starter relay for corrosion/Charring. Replace if needed (tutorial in progress)
SUGGESTION: Perform Charging Mod
SUGGESTION: Perform Headlight Mod
SUGGESTION: Check wires for frays. Re-tape as needed.
SUGGESTION: Check coolant reservoir
SUGGESTION: Replace Drive Sprocket
SUGGESTION: Replace Chain (Tutorial in progress)
SUGGESTION: Replace Tire (Tutorial in progress)


NOTE: It's ok if you accidently squeeze the clutch lever while Clutch Cylinder is off. Just squeeze the cylinder back into place by hand. Blah blah blah


# Brake Caliper = 12mm
# Axle Bolt = ???
# Shift Linkage = 08mm
# Sprocket Cover = 08mm
# Drive sprocket = 32mm
# Remove Push-Rod before removing chain from sprocket so not to damage it

CRAP THAT WILL END UP IN THE GUIDE SOMEWHERE...

The holes are in the side of the shaft just outside the bearing.
Only use genuine seals as aftermarket ones are usually slightly smaller diameter and the ones I have looked at are harder.
The genuine seals seem to bulge back to full size in the gap at the back and this helps them to grip and stay in.
When you pull a genuine one out you can see the bulged bit and there is usually a bit of tearing of this from pulling the seal out.


Oil is pumped into the gap behind the seal and then has to go into the drive shaft and into and through the countershaft to lubricate bearing surfaces of gears, and lastly comes out the end of the countershaft and is part of the clutch lubricating system, so if the hole is blocked it not only causes pressure to build behind the seal, it compromises countershaft and clutch lubrication.

When installing oil seals lubricate the lips of the seal with oil or grease along with the shaft or boss that fits into the oil seal. The oil seal needs a minimal fluid film between its lips and the turning shaft to maintain a good seal and to dissipate heat. An oil seal installed dry may not seal at all, and will most likely fail prematurely. O-rings should be treated in the same manner and not installed dry unless otherwise specified by the service manual.
If the crankcase vent became clogged, it would allow the case to become pressurized and push oil out around the counter shaft.

I don't think you understand the lubrication system of the engine
Oil comes under pressure, from the oil pump to the cavity behind the oil seal (the oil seal and the bearing form a cavity), the under then passes through the notches in the spacer and into the output shaft where it goes along and lubricates the gears.
Take you sprocket off, and start your engine - the oil pressure will pop out the spacer that the seal runs on



A countershaft seal isn't too hard to replace, so it seems unlikely your dealer did it wrong twice in a row. I would suspect you are building excessive crankcase pressure and that is causing the seal to fail- this could be caused by a blocked crankcase breather or by a really bad case of blow-by.

Have your mechanic make certain the crankcase vent is clear, and if it is do a either a leak-down test or at least a compression test. You may be due for a set of rings.


blocked crankcase vent

PCV

Seal in too far blocking oil ports
Overfilling oil
Chain too tight causing pressure on countershaft
Bad spacer O-ring
Metal burrs on case destroying seal
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Found issue #1- Images are too damn big :uhoh
 

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:) :banana
 

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Josh,
Nice write up and great photos. :thumbup
It will come in handy for many of us. Please make it a sticky when you are done with it.

In the meantime, I found this error.
You call this the "camshaft position sensor" in both the dis-assembly and Reassembly sections. The item you are showing in the photo is actually the SPEEDOMETER Sensor.

The camshaft position sensor is on top of the rear valve cover.

Remove Camshaft Position Sensor using Allen Wrench #
??? (Put bolt back in afterwards)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
...In the meantime, I found this error. You call this the "camshaft position sensor" ...is actually the SPEEDOMETER Sensor.
Well this bit of info will prove useful while I'm troubleshooting my speedometer issue this weekend :laugh
 

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Discussion Starter #15
NOTES:

CORRECTION: Camshaft Position Sensor = Speedometer sensor
CORRECTION: Resize images
CORRECTION: Replace blurry images

ADDITION: Any procedural differences between the R and S models
ADDITION: Explanation on why part numbers listed are for SV1000
ADDITION: Fairing Disassembly
ADDITION: Tire reassembly (repack bearings, grease the axle, etc..)
ADDITION: How to properly tighten and lube chain (explain dangers of over-tightening)
ADDITION: Example image of your worn rear sprocket with broken teeth. Explain how retarded you felt when you thought it was a sheared gear going down the road. Include info for replacement (what was his name?)

SUGGESTION: Flush hydraulic fluid (clutch)
SUGGESTION: Check Brake pads- Replace if needed (will need tutorial)
SUGGESTION: Check Air Filter- Replace if needed (will need tutorial)
 

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Nice work! :)

Some suggestions:
There´s no need to take the rear wheel of. Just take of the nut and the chain adjuster plate from the rear axle, that gives you enough space to take the chain of.
Put a cloth on the left end of the swing arm, so you can lay the chain on it without causing scratches.

But first of all: Losen the nut from the drive shaft first. It´s easier when the chain hold´s the sprocket while the rear wheel is blocked. If there´s no impact wrench you can block the rear wheel with a wooden stick, wich is laying on both sides of the swing arm and holds a spoke in the middle.

Use a hook to pull the seals out. Normally you have a hook to assemble the springs on the exhaust or the side stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Nice work! :)... There´s no need to take the rear wheel off. Just take of the nut and the chain adjuster plate from the rear axle, that gives you enough space to take the chain off...
I spent a couple days mulling over whether or not to incorporate this into guide. While I always like to my guides to be as inclusive as possible (especially since some folks may not have a rear stand), I've decided to retain the wheel removal as the de facto standard for several reasons

(1) More choices means more confusion. Those looking for this guide will likely be novices, like I was at the time, and so the best thing for them is a simple straight forward Do-This-And-Only-This type guide.

(2) I tried removing the chain and drive sprocket without pulling the tire on my very first attempt and I couldn't do it. No to mention I busted all my knuckles up in the process. Since everything needs to be loosened anyway it's just easier to remove the hole thing. I do like your suggestion regarding using a piece of wood to lock the drive sprocket. It makes sense to keep it in neutral rather than placing sudden torque on the gears. Obviously this doesn't work without the rear tire, but I'm thinking a pair of vice grips on the chain might accomplish the same goal? I'm going to look into this one.

(3) Removing the rear tire will give access to areas of the bike which typically get neglected (by the inexperienced, like I was). For example, cleaning the under tail, the chain pad, the area around the shock, etc.. Checking break pads or flushing brake lines. Repacking the rear tire bearings. Greasing the axle. Inspected the rear sprocket. Physically manipulated the chain to check for tight spots. etc. etc. etc. Even though the premise is to cover seal replacement, there's always room to seamlessly provide insight into other related areas without disrupting the natural flow of the guide. Additionally, it also allows other detailed tutorials, such as the charging mod or relay wire replacement, to be linked into a central information source. So while I don't go into detail on how to install a rear tire or replace a chain in this guide I do reference it, so in the future if someone is changing the seals and realizes they do need to change the tire they can simply link to that tutorial from this one. One stop shop. But to the point- All this potential knowledge and maintenance would be harder to sell to the reader if there were a tire blocking access to everything.


I appreciate the feedback. Sorry for the rambling. I'm pretty passionate when it comes to documentation design. I absolutely HATE spending hours scouring the internet for bread crumbs of information. If you're going to teach something to someone... teach it all :shortbus
 

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JoshCampbell said:
I do like your suggestion regarding using a piece of wood to lock the drive sprocket. It makes sense to keep it in neutral rather than placing sudden torque on the gears. Obviously this doesn't work without the rear tire....
That´s why i wrote "first of all: Loosen the nut from the drive shaft." ;)

JoshCampbell said:
Removing the rear tire will give access to areas of the bike which typically get neglected (by the inexperienced, like I was). For example, cleaning the under tail, the chain pad, the area around the shock, etc.. Checking break pads or flushing brake lines. Repacking the rear tire bearings. Greasing the axle. Inspected the rear sprocket. Physically manipulated the chain to check for tight spots. etc. etc. etc.
Absolutely right! :thumbup
This is the reason, why i took of the swing arm off every spring.
I washed the chain, cleaned all the bearings of the rod and the swing arm th put fresh grease in. (astounding, how much dirt you will find there after only 12 months!!) So i was still going with the first bearings after more than 60.000mls. The chains always lasts for about 20.000mls.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey all my images are restored. Yippee!!
 
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