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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey gang, I've been reading a bit here that some people have said Ohlins have acknowledged the fact that the shock shaft for the SU 806 (TLR model) is too short. I have just e-mailed Will Kroom in NL. and he says he has never heard of the problem! EVER!:O
So, my question is.... has anyone ever had their shaft replaced and/or spoken to an Ohlins dealer that has acknoledged the problem ?? If so, which Ohlins dealer ? I'm in Tasmania so I probably gonna be stuggling no matter what...... and that's NOT because I've got two heads.....lol:rolleyes
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
S ohlins is too short too, if it makes you feel better.
Not really but thanks for tryin'. Someone has apparently made a R/H adjuster for the 'S' but it's a completely different setup.:banghead
 

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My S is about 3/4 in higher after the Ohlins install, so I would dispute the too short claim. Also I have installed 3 or 4 Ohlins on TLR's and all of them were at about the same height as the Penske that I had in when it was in the stock ride height.
 

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I've never had an issue with my now very old Ohlins TLS rear damper being too short. You just can't lift the rear of the bike up like an inch higher over stock with a RHA or you will be topping out the rear shock. Talking with very knowledgeable suspension folks there is NO reason to jack that rear end up that high. Once you put a stiffer rear spring on the bike it will make the rear of the bike sit around an inch higher than stock with an Ohlins damper installed. If you then decide that you want to jack the rear end up even higher say with a RHA the Ohlins will top out guaranteed. Jacking the rear end up way high will not make the bike handle like a 100 pound lighter GSXR. That in line four has a very different chassis & trying to set your TL up so it works like one doesn't make sense. Sorry, folks it just ain't gonna happen; the chassis is what the real issue is along with rear springs that are too weak. V2 in Australia stopped making the Ride Height Adjusters for a reason. Yes, I have one of the original V2 RHA mounted on my bike & it is set to the stock setting.

:)
 

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That's right. It may feel more nimble with the rear raised up but as soon as you blast into a turn a little hot you will push the front end. It's NOT a good feeling.:scared
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Far Out. I'm no expert, I'm only goin' on looks, seat of the pants feeling & stuff I've read on this forum. Just can't seem to get the same confidence out of the front as I've felt on other bikes. It handles pretty good really but there's no harm in tryin' to get it better.
I didn't measure the RH before I installed the Ohlins so I don't REALLY know WHICH way it went! I've read threads here that some have gone higher, some lower & some stayed the same. Only talking about a TLR tho'.:thumbup
 

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I have TLS Ohlins with RHA and no problems here, even when I had the rear raised 15mm, no problems at all
 

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S ohlins is too short too, if it makes you feel better.
That's wrong sir. The TLS ohlins is almost exactly 1cm longer than needed for stock ride height. 1cm measured at the shock, not at the wheel!
At least that's the case on my bike.

If you're speaking about ride height with Ohlins and stock spring, that's something different. That's not the fault of the Ohlins... that would be the fault of a too weak stock spring.

Greetings
Rufer
 

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I agree with Rufer

The TLS Ohlins has nothing to with ride height. Because the damper is under pressure it does slightly stiffen up the rear.

The Ohlins is 1cm longer to allow people to raise the rear ride height without topping out the damper.

I race with +15mm rear ride height and -12mm front ride height and still stable, still turns like an oil tanker but like Mr. DOBALINA says, you will never get it handling like a modern 1000 inline 4
 

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Hey gang, I've been reading a bit here that some people have said Ohlins have acknowledged the fact that the shock shaft for the SU 806 (TLR model) is too short. I have just e-mailed Will Kroom in NL. and he says he has never heard of the problem! EVER!:O
So, my question is.... has anyone ever had their shaft replaced and/or spoken to an Ohlins dealer that has acknoledged the problem ?? If so, which Ohlins dealer ? I'm in Tasmania so I probably gonna be stuggling no matter what...... and that's NOT because I've got two heads.....lol:rolleyes
Wim Kroon doesn't give a flying F*** about your concerns, only cares about selling.

Better mail to Öhlins in Sweden directly. Ride height with the Öhlins should be 10mm higher than stock.

Check your PM's
 

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I have TLS Ohlins with RHA and no problems here, even when I had the rear raised 15mm, no problems at all
Do you still have that stock TLS rear spring installed though? And if you do how much do you weigh (with or without rider's gear - specify)? How much rider's sag do you have back there right now & how much static sag are you running? These are all super important considerations to be addressed if you do this suspension stuff right & if you are going that route you should have those numbers handy.

The TLS riders I used to run into at the track were very quick to get a new rear damper which is good but to solve the rear ride height issue tried to find a RHA. That's why prices of those things went sky high as V2 stopped making them. Not many decided to look at how much sag they had out back & if they would have done that they would realize that rear spring is the culprit. It is way too soft even for a street rider & definitely way too soft for track day or performance riding. Like Doug stated if you install the proper spring the rear of the TLS jumps up. The Ohlins damper will not top out under that condition. If you decide that isn't high enough for you & you start jacking it up back even more than a few millimeter (not sure how much) & yes that Ohlins damper will top out. I've ridden my TLS with the Ohlins topped out & it is not good. Very, very scary at speed in fact & I hope members here realize this is something to be avoided. Wicked ass weaving while traveling in a straight line under hard acceleration at well over a hundred miles an hour is no fun. It felt like it was the front that was weaving but it was the rear as it was the last suspension adjustment I made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bdejong. I think you maybe right! I'm getting a lot of conflicting info on this :confused
 

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I will give you my 2 cents worth. The stock Ohlins TLR setup gives you stock TLR ride height, the problem is in my experience the stock TLR ride height is too low. The Ohlins setup for the TLR has no provision to allow a ride height change like the stock setup does by shimming the upper spring yoke mount. The solution to the Ohlins ride height problem on the TLR is to fabricate new mounting brackets, locally some TLR ohlins owners have had a machine shop plug the Ohlins bracket and redrill the upper mounting holes for the shock lower down think they suceeded in moving the hole 4-5 mm which improves the turn in on the TLR substantially. On the stock ones I have worked on and on the Showa conversion ones I raise the rear 10mm at the spring yoke.
 

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The position of the top yoke for the Öhlins is determined by the position of the rotary damper hinges on the left and the position of the top spring (adjustable) hinge on the right side.

Suzuki didn't care much about the exact position of the damper hinges, and they shlouldn't. It doesn't affect the position of the spring, but only the position of the damper, which will work anyway, not affecting ride hight.

Öhlins grabbed a TLR from the shop and made some mounting plates, not realising some hinges are a bit off. If you're familiar with the öhlins mounting plates, you'll see that a little 'off' on the bottom mounting points means a lot off for the left top mounting lug, and a lot less ride height.

Not Confinced?... Look right here.

And Öhlins fixed it no charge, Great stuff.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks guys,I totally agree with you Doug. I like sound of your idea it's probably the most feasable for me as I don't think I'd bother sending my shock back to Sweden from Tassie!
 

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You can clamp the top yoke of the shock between the two plates, but when riding it will hammer to the highest position. There can be a weight something like 1,5 tonnes on the lugs. You'll need to lock the top bolt in the lowest position with an insert or something.

While you're at it replace the bottom mounting bolt with a type with a longer shaft, preventing the thread hammering into your swingarm.

Mind the Aluminium quality used by Öhlins for the mounting plates:
SS 4338-06 or AA 2014 T6

Enjoy.
 

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man I don't know guys. I had 800 lb on TLS and with my RHA where I wanted it it topped out my ohlins pretty hard . Of course your results may vary with setup but wasn;t there some talk a while back about getting ohlins to pony up longer shafts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Man, I'm getting confused:confused I dunno about any of this TLS stuff 'cause its just completely different! I thought making new mounting brackets on the 'R' would give you the extra RH & you should still be able to mount the shock at the correct position ??:confused
 

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man I don't know guys. I had 800 lb on TLS and with my RHA where I wanted it it topped out my ohlins pretty hard . Of course your results may vary with setup but wasn;t there some talk a while back about getting ohlins to pony up longer shafts?
OK, so high above stock did you want that rear end to sit?

You are not telling us how high so how can we respond to that comment? In my case there was really no reason to jack that sucker higher up. But what is the magical number you were shooting at? And why that number?

Did you notice the rear end jumped way up high by just putting a stiffer spring back there? These are not independent variables. Also notice how much room you have to stuff a damper in that space in the first place. It is not as simple as just shoving a longer shaft into the body of the damper. I really don't think there is much room left in the damper body itself to do this. Support the rear end of the bike through the swingarm pivot so the rear wheel hangs free & you can get the suspension to be fully extended. Now grab a ruler & measure the length of the exposed portion of the Ohlins damper rod. How long is it? Now with that ruler measure the length of the Ohlins damper body. I think these two lengths will provide some input for you.
 
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