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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got back from deals gap a few weeks ago( www.killboy.com november 9-12 for pics) with my new this year lindemann forks and penske shock and was playing with the settings when i was down there (kind of new to that too) and thought i had something a little out of wack in the forks , felt like low speed chatter , (not sure if it was) never felt anything like that before down there, ride the gap 2 -3 times a year . thought it might just be that road because its like no other(318 slow, tight corners) so i go 1 turn out on the front rebound had them at 2 turns, didn't touch nothing else and oh my god what a change! the bike felt so nice and turned much better, felt like a new bike. always thought you want to be on the soft side for the street but got to say for me more rebound damping the better. the forks now have so much adjustment that i was scared to go far from what lindemann calls for base settings but it worked!!!
 

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If the track is smooth you want to dial in more rebound damping up front (& even more in the rear) as that extra rebound up front helps keep the front wheel on the pavement as you get on the gas on the exit of a turn. If there are bumps on the exits the front will kind of wallow around & you will lose traction if you have that much rebound dialed in. That's what you were experiencing out there I think. The front losing some traction as you were getting on the gas so with more rebound dialed in the front tire was forced to stay on the road & you got the grip you needed to go faster. So play around with that setting! Often times with a well set up set of forks you just need a little tweak & the bike will go from feeling good to feeling awesome! Pretty cool, ehh?

Imagine all those people riding bikes with fork oil that is several years old where you have virtually no rebound damping even if the adjuster is set right close to maximum! Scary isn't it? Just don't know what they are missing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input. I have read alot of your threads on how to mess around with setting and have learned alot. You seem to be spot on with what you said about what i was feeling with forks. Night and day difference with one turn.
 

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Cool! Looks like you are getting it down. Just add that front end feel to your knowledge database. When you ride it on bumpier roads with all that extra front rebound dialed in you will feel that wallowing sensation & then you know it needs 1/4 to 1/2 turn less rebound. If you keep it up you should be able to pinpoint this stuff just after riding the bike over a few turns. Just takes some time & practice then getting used to the feel & how to correct it. I work with people who just do this for a living & they make me look like a rank amateur! Hey remember when you are doing this to try to keep the front & rear end in balance as well. Really fun stuff once you get some of this stuff learned - way better to actually feel what it does instead of just reading it in a book!

:devious
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ya the bike feels so different than stock that it took awhile to be comfortable on it (even at my pace) LOL..
 

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One question regarding fork oil. Having replaced it some years ago with decent stuff (I don't remember exactly what :coocoo ) should it be replaced again based on time or mileage? I ask because I haven't put many miles on since then.
 

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Mostly mileage - only thing that's going to happen over time is very very slight and slow contamination via condensation. Given the small air volumn and the fact that the forks are sorta sealed up you won't get much at all. I would think the oil would be nearly as happy sitting in your fork leg as in a bottle on a shelf:)

just my 2c
 

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I don't agree, BikePilot. There is always abrasion (wear) of the fork internals and the oil will get dusty over time.
Fork oil should be changed every 2nd year if you want a good suspension. For track use every year.

Greetings
Rufer
 

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I agree about the wear and contamination, but its not going to wear much sitting still in the garage I don't think. I'm all for keeping fork oil fresh, but say someone puts 20k miles a year on a bike and another person puts 2k a year - seems the guy at 2k a year wouldn't need to change fork oil nearly as often as the guy at 20k a year:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I do know that the first time my forks were serviced at about 15,000 miles(2 years) (not lindemann) they said my oil looked in bad shape. One thing I'd like to say about lindemann is that I am very happy about the work they did. But I also have to say they took twice as long as i was told it would take, (was not happy about that!) They did take $25.00 of the rebuild of my penske shock ( after I bitched alittle)that made up for the lost riding time.
 

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Cool! Looks like you are getting it down. Just add that front end feel to your knowledge database. When you ride it on bumpier roads with all that extra front rebound dialed in you will feel that wallowing sensation & then you know it needs 1/4 to 1/2 turn less rebound. If you keep it up you should be able to pinpoint this stuff just after riding the bike over a few turns. Just takes some time & practice then getting used to the feel & how to correct it. I work with people who just do this for a living & they make me look like a rank amateur! Hey remember when you are doing this to try to keep the front & rear end in balance as well. Really fun stuff once you get some of this stuff learned - way better to actually feel what it does instead of just reading it in a book!

:devious
Does that wallowing sensation caused by too much rebound over bumpy surfaces apply to the rear as well??? I get a definate "wallow" from the rear when pushing through sweepers with some uneven surfaces (could just be the POS rotary!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My guess is the POS rotary damper, because I had the same wallowing from the rear until MR PENSKE came into town. But my rotary POS seemed to have little to no rebound at all even cranked all the way up.
 
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I believe that the general consensus is 7 wt and the correct springs for your weight and riding style. TLSDoug could chime in on this one....SC
 

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I have run 10wt., 15wt. & even 20wt. fully synthetic fork oil in my 97' TLS forks over the years. Fully synthetic fork oil really rocks! At the time the bike was run at the track monthly but I also ran it on the street. That was in the late 90's & at the turn of the century. The 10wt. felt much better on the street & very good on the track. Since I frequently changed the fork oil & was being coached by a knowledgeable friend I tried 15wt. which felt even better on the track than the 10 wt. & still felt pretty darn good on the street. On a whim I tried the 20wt. to see if it would work at all at the track as the 15wt. felt really good in that environment. Nope, it was way overkill on the track & it felt horrible on the street. So it was out of there in a few weeks, as soon as I needed to get the bike ready for another track day. I opted for the 15 wt. which I changed out about every 7 or 8 months. Just a tad rough on the street but it felt so good on the track that's what I stuck with. Think 12.5 wt would be a good compromise for most folks & 10wt. for those that are a little nervous about experimenting. Definitely get the right springs in there though when you make the swap. FWIW - at that time I weighed 155 - 160 lbs. without riding gear. Yes, how much you weigh will have an impact on what weight fork oil you may want to play around with on a set of non-revalved forks...

Yes, the rear rotary damper will help make the rear end wallow when you push it hard. But then again the entire rear end set up with a rotary dumper is off for performance riding especially in an environment that isn't super smooth. You have way, way, way too much compression damping dialed in on that thing (unless you back off the comp adjuster almost all the way out) & very little rebound damping even if you set it very close to maximum. That is pretty much just the opposite of what you are aiming at for a baseline track setting. And when the rotary damper gets hot even that little rebound damping goes away.
:laugh
 
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