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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pretty straightforward as the title says. I have no idea what I'm doing or what I'm looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Nevermind I figured it out. Thanks to the 20+ people who viewed but said nothing.

Don't know how to delete the thread.
 

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Glad you were able to find it. Did you get a copy of the repair manual? I know there's a diagram for the cooling system in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Please someone help me. The diagrams online aren't helping me. I need actual pictures of where it is.
 

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Well, looks like you found the WATER PUMP.

Seriously, PLEASE look in the manual! It's all in there.
Or have someone else do the work.

The thermostat housing resides in the "V" between the two cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well if I could find a manual I would.

If I could have someone work on it I would.

Idk what inside the v mean. Like inside the engine? On one side or the other? Need more specifics
 

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Well if I could find a manual I would.

Idk what inside the v mean. Like inside the engine? On one side or the other? Need more specifics
Jason, I posted a link to Steve's website in your other thread, 8 days ago in post #4. The service manual can be downloaded from there in a PDF format. The link is quoted again below.

Also, others besides myself, have repeatedly recommended that you read the manual. Why didn't you tell us then that you couldn't find it?

The TLR uses a "V-twin engine." That means the engine has two cylinders arranged in a "V" configuration, not side-by-side (parallel twin), not opposed to each other like a BMW R-Model, but a "V," like a Harley engine, only much cooler. :cool:

Since you are new at owning a TL, be sure to download the service manual from Steve's site here.
Steve's TL1000S pages
I also said previously, that the thermostat resides in the 'V' BETWEEN the two cylinders. So then, your next assignment is to find the two engine cylinders. Once you find them, look down between them (below the throttle bodies), and you will have a revelation.

Then take a picture of the thermostat housing, and post it up so we can confirm you are looking at the correct part.. Then someone will step you through the next portion....
 

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The cover you have removed is the cover for the water pump. If you look at the rear of the inlet spigot that the pipe that comes from the radiator is attached to there will be a smaller pipe that goes between the 2 cylinder heads/ barrels.at the end of this pipe is the thermostat housing. To access the thermostat housing you will need to lift the tank and remove the air filter box. You will need a very long Phillips screw driver to release the airbox from the throttle bodies . There are a number of pipes and sensors attached to it you will need to disconnect and remember where they go. Please download the manual, I'm sure you will need it
 

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..... To access the thermostat housing you will need to lift the tank and remove the air filter box. You will need a very long Phillips screw driver to release the airbox from the throttle bodies .
tlsgazza, In this case, the long Phillips screwdriver is not necessary. This is one area where the TLR differs from the TLS. Notice in the photo below, the three screw bosses surrounding each bore of the TLR throttle bodies. These are the points where the airbox attaches to the top of the throttle bodies, note the O-ring that seals between the mating surfaces. So then, the airbox is bolted to the tops of the throttle bodies with the same screws that attach the metal intake trumpet to the bore of each TB.
Whereas, the TLS air box has rubber boots (along with rubber trumpets) that utilize clamps around the tops of the TBs. Hence, the need for a long screwdriver.

DSCN7606_injector markings by Tony Six5, on Flickr
 

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tlsgazza, In this case, the long Phillips screwdriver is not necessary. This is one area where the TLR differs from the TLS. Notice in the photo below, the three screw bosses surrounding each bore of the TLR throttle bodies. These are the points where the airbox attaches to the top of the throttle bodies, note the O-ring that seals between the mating surfaces. So then, the airbox is bolted to the tops of the throttle bodies with the same screws that attach the metal intake trumpet to the bore of each TB.
Whereas, the TLS air box has rubber boots (along with rubber trumpets) that utilize clamps around the tops of the TBs. Hence, the need for a long screwdriver.

DSCN7606_injector markings by Tony Six5, on Flickr
Not having worked on a R I didn't know this. Bloody suzuki making it easy for you lot.lol Well hopefully this might make it easier for the OP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The cover you have removed is the cover for the water pump. If you look at the rear of the inlet spigot that the pipe that comes from the radiator is attached to there will be a smaller pipe that goes between the 2 cylinder heads/ barrels.at the end of this pipe is the thermostat housing. To access the thermostat housing you will need to lift the tank and remove the air filter box. You will need a very long Phillips screw driver to release the airbox from the throttle bodies . There are a number of pipes and sensors attached to it you will need to disconnect and remember where they go. Please download the manual, I'm sure you will need it
Thank you. This is the information I needed. That was very helpful indeed 😊
 
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