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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been riding for a little over a year... had my courses last year with an added 8 hours on the road during the class. I got the TLR like a month ago and it was pretty banged up (previous owner crashed pretty bad on it) but with a new engine/transmission and a spare gas tank it was an amazing deal.
(I know, 1000cc for a first bike, what was I thinking haha!)

So I was driving on the expressway last night going about 60-65 mph when I get to a turn... nothing big just a regular turn that you could take at 65 mph in a car.

So I lean in and start turning, I'm on the leftmost lane and right beside me is a big cement divider. A few seconds into the turn the bike starts wobbling very bad. Very, very, bad. I barely managed to get through the turn, and that cement wall was getting dangerously close to me. The wobbles were so pronounced I was swinging back and forth on the whole width of the lane. Imagine this for an inexperienced rider and you'll know how much I flipped out after! Luckily I managed to get into the middle lane and straighten out by the end of the turn.
What an adrenaline rush!

Afterwards, like any normal human being, I decided to blame it on something else than me. I was thinking to myself isn't the steering damper supposed to prevent stuff like that from happening? Maybe its not working properly? Maybe I hit a bump in the road? Did something I shouldn't have?

I have no idea, and I can't remember if I did anything in particular in that situation.
I've already taken turns much much sharper with a lot more leaning but at lower speeds with no trouble.

What gives? :scared
 

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My guess is your tires are flat, worn or too old. If they are good check wheel bearings, steering head bearings, etc.
 

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Still have the stock rear damper on there I'll bet. Sort your suspension and you won't have those problems.
 

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I am still running stock suspension on mine and have never had any problems with head shake taking any turn whether it be slow or somewhat spirited riding. So I agree with BP that you should check tires, wheel bearings and your steering stem bearings. not too mention if it was crashed hard you may want to look at your wheels themselves to make sure they aren't tweaked.
 

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By clean and tight I mean clean everything with brake spray or tri-chlor then torque to spec

Check the steering damper for initial movement before it resists.
Throw out the stock damper regardless and get a Hyperpro RSC. You'll love the way it DOESN'T damp at low movement speeds, makes the bike feel much lighter in the parking lot and around town yet stil works really well if the fork tries to move too fast. Any twin-tube with a "8" cross-section like an Ohlins will work well without much initial freeplay and work great for the track, but the Hyperpro RSC is wonderful for the street.

Check:
tires and inflation (size, series, cupping, flat spots, scallops, shape, profile, compound, hardness, mfg date code)
swingarm pivot bearings
steering neck bearings
front wheel bearings
rear wheel bearings and cush bearings.
front fork tripleclamp pinchbolts to the the fork leg uppers clean and tight
front axle and fork leg lower pinchbolts clean, loosened on adjustable side, fork bounced to align fork and find parallel, then tightened to torque spec.
rear axle adjusted for sufficient chain play, adjuster bolts and axle nut tight and keyed/pinned
Check alignment of both wheels, preferably with boards but can be done with string.
Check chain pull angle (what sprocket sizes, any swingarm pivot offset adapter?)
Bounce front; check for reasonable damping (not too much or too little)
bounce rear, check for damping (not too much or too little)
ride a washboard road and check for pump-up or pump-down
check static sag and adjust front and rear preloads or spring rates for your weight and any load
check left-right weight distribution and neck alignment by making sure it tracks straight with you sitting upright straight and centered, riding no-hands on a safe smooth road (no wind). If you have to sit crooked or move your butt off-center to ride straight, there's a weight distribution or alignment problem.

If you have to, there are services for precision checking of frame geometry.

Slappers seem worst, not when it's bouncing thru its suspension undamped but when the suspension locks up and doesn't move quickly at all and it bounces much harder on its tires. So make sure there's not too much high-speed damping at either end, especially compression damping.

Also, less of a cause but still a concern, when you're really leaned over, anything loose becomes a bouncy problem, so make sure your heavy mufflers are mounted stable, battery is bolted tight, no loose toolkit under the seat, etc.

Unweighted front sometimes makes it worse. Don't put heavy toolkits etc. at the extreme rear of the under-seat trunk.
 

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FWIW I put 60k miles on my stock-suspension S (which is probably less stable than a stock R) and the only time it wobbled about was when the oem Metz. Z1 tires started to get worn and then it only wobbled at moderate lean angles while under power. If I cornered hard no wobbles, straight line no wobbles. New tires and it was gone. The wobbles were a bit unnerving, felt like the rear end was wagging side to side by a good foot+.
 

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all the above check..especially if its been in an acccident....these bikes are not for the novice, though you probably fair better than more experienced riders, so you wont be used to lite flickable modern sportsbikes, these bikes need to be ridden....with respect and be prepaired to manhandle them round corners,otherwise they will run wide and shake there head accelerating out of corners (i ditched the steering damper after a year and have had no serious tank slappers) even a good setup on one be smooth on the throttle and hang off it
 

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At 65 mph, I dont think that should be happening. Like everyone says, go over the bike with a fine tooth comb. Maybe something was bent or damaged when the previous owner wrecked it.
 

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Like they said check everything and torque them up to specs, I have riden the road in Montreal and they arent the greatest, they are pretty rough, was it cool out? because if your tire didn't have enough heat in it you wont get a good feel, also what type of tire you got on your bike? I find Bridgetone take longer to warm up compare to Dunlop or Michilen. I use the Bridgetone because they last longer than the others.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks so much for the input guys! Right now I'm working crazy shifts but as soon as I have time ill check it out and report back.
 

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I am still running stock suspension on mine and have never had any problems with head shake taking any turn whether it be slow or somewhat spirited riding. So I agree with BP that you should check tires, wheel bearings and your steering stem bearings. not too mention if it was crashed hard you may want to look at your wheels themselves to make sure they aren't tweaked.
same here - mine's all stock - something sounds very wrong with the geometry of the bike - could even have a bent frame? suggested standard rear shock settings are full compression - no rebound to help with head shaking probs.
 
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