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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys - My job takes me away from home for a few weeks and then home for a week, but i have just signed up for a 12 month solid contract interstate which starts early Jan '09. I really dont want to take the TLR with me as it is a hot dusty and straight road environment that will not suit it at all - it would be best tucked up at home in it's shed whilst the busa can eat red dust and dodge roos :)

What would your suggestions be as far as storage goes and what should i do after it has been sitting to get it back on the road again :O

Thanks in advance

John
 

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Fill it to the brim with fuel, throw some cheap oil in it, run it for a few minutes (change it when you get back). Get the tyres off the ground. Take the battery out of it. If you're keen pull the plugs and mist the cylinders.

Make sure mice or rats can't feat on it too.

Sydney has a mild climate, you could probably get away with doing nothing :laugh
 

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Yep, store it with fresh clean oil in it, just in case it sits longer than you originally intended. Disconnect the battery and put it on a smart tender (or a dumb small wall-wart trickle charger on a light timer so its only on 15 minutes a day). Clean the chain with WD40 and put WD on anything that might rust. Make sure there's no swimming pool chemicals in that garage or shed. Change the brake fluid after storage.
 

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Ive got a trip coming up to sydney in the next month or so. I bought a rotary table i want to collect and i visit family etc. leave the keys in the letter box and i'll pick it up and look after it for 12 months no worries:devious


seriously tho :stupid
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mate - if it was any other bike I would sell it, but i'll never be able to buy another one of these beauties, plus there's all of Vans goodies on there :)

Cheers John
 

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I read a long time ago thatwhen you have an engine sitting around for a long time, its advisable to drop a tablespoon of oil into the cylinders. Is this true and what does it do??

OzTiller, maybe cancel the rego as well and get your money back. Shouldn't be too hard to get a RWC when you get back
 

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Yep, the oil in the cylinders is a good thing, pull the plugs, drop the oil in( little bit more than a tablespoon is fine) crank the motor over couple times which will spread the oil around the bore & piston etc, stick the plugs back in. Remove the battery (do not put on concrete, the cold will kill it), desirably buy a charge and maintain battery charger, this will constantly check the status us the battery every few min and when it is needed will charge. DO NOT use a battery charger that will constantly charge a fully charged battery as this will also kill it. Keep both wheels off the ground as it will make the rubber go harder where the tyre is in contact with the concrete (create hard spots in the rubber). There is a fuel additive that you can put into it when you leave it full of fuel to, coats the injectors etc.
As per what the others have said, wrap it up in the garage, away from other chemicals etc (as mentioned pool chlorine etc).
And as importantly enjoy life.
 

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The whole thing about battery on concrete is urban legend, a myth that even my high school automotive teacher preached. It all started when acid batteries were made in hard rubber cases and all had slight leaks thru the case; when the acid thru the case got to the concrete it would conduct enough to add internal resistance and shor the battery which would then sulfate. Hasn't been a concern since they invented plastic battery shells. The cold is actually good for battery life, unless it's all discharged and freezes. Cold reduces the batteyr performacne until it warms up, but it's heat that destroys batterys, not cold...but when its cold you find out your battery was damaged last summer 'cause when it's cold the battery performance is poor and the oil is thick.

When they put up outboard motors for the winter, they remove the filter and spray oil into the intake until it dies, then change plugs in the spring. But oil sprayed into the intake of a high-compression 4-stroke can cause damage. Yet that's how they shut down the big drag bikes too. Normally its to prevent rings rusting to cast-iron cylinders; we don't really have that problem, but our valves do get some surface rust sometimes, so you might spray a little WD into the TBs while you crank with the plug wires off, of something like that.

Old oil has hydrochloric acid in it from combustion blowby, condensation moisture will extract and concentrate the acid in a thin line floating at the surface of the oil, etching a 'water line' on everything.
 

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If you can't afford a smart charger (which I strongly agree you really should use) get the smallest wall-blob type low-current trickle charger you can find, and put it on a light timer like your parents use to turn the house lights off and on when they're gone, so the cahrger only runs for a few minutes every day. Measure the battery a few days and adjust the timer.
 

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If you find that your battery does die, you can get one from Kmart for about $80ish. It comes with a 1 year guarantee. In my opinion, its a better deal then a Yuasa as its one third of the price and come with a 1 year guarantee whilst the Yuasa is only 2 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've been through the whole cheaper battery thing - last year i went through 3 cheapies in 12 months:banghead First of all they usually stop in the middle of nowhere then you have to take it back with the receipt to swap for a new one and then the whole process starts again.

I went and bought a new gel Yuasa for each bike and haven't had a problem since - as long as i ride each within a week or two then they start first time and you know the twin needs the extra cranks to get it going.

All the above advice has been great thanks everyone - Will get it off the ground before i go and fill with fresh oil and petrol and follow your advice when i get back :)

Cheers Ozzie
 
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