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Discussion Starter #1
is it possible to replace just the tumbler in my ignition switch? I purchased an aftermarket ignition switch, gas cap and seat lock set for my 1998 TLR so I would have 1 key that fits all. unfortunately the ignition switch does not fit because it only has 4 wires where the factory has 6. I was thinking I could take the tumbler out of the new switch and install it in the old switch of anyone could tell me how to remove the tumbler from the old switch. thanks for any help.
 

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I bought a secondhand complete oe switch for my tls and swapped the key tumbler part over to keep my original key, it was quite easy but it was years ago, :laugh,
I doubt if they will be compatible if yours is aftermarket but shouldn't be too hard to find out.

I bought a replacement because the ecu wasn't recognising the chip in the switch anymore so my bike wouldn't start, I've heard of some aftermarket replacements having the same problem ,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not sure mine has the chip. I have replaced the keys with ebay keys and they work without having to program anything.
 

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Not sure mine has the chip. I have replaced the keys with ebay keys and they work without having to program anything.
It is not a "chip" of the sort that some cars use - within the key. It is merely a resistor built into the switch itself that the ECM senses with the key in the "ON" position. It is a meager attempt to offer some protection against hotwiring the ignition system.

The two wires lacking on your aftermarket switch are the ones for the internal resistor - the Org/Red and Blk/Wht wires.

It has been my experience that the tumbler set from the aftermarket switch will not fit into the OEM switch housing. They are different just enough to discourage part swapping. On the other hand, there are aftermarket switches out there that do contain the resistor, and they are plug-n-play. However, you would be back to square one with unmatched keys for the tank and ignition.

One more thing, at least with the aftermarket switch I used, the key would physically not fit into the OEM tumbler set. The ridges and slots along the length of the key were different. So that ruled out filing down the tumbler discs in the fuel cap lock to fit the new key.

You could follow the route that tlsgazza describes, or solder a 100 ohm resistor into the loom to keep the ECM happy, and use the 4-wire aftermarket ignition switch you now have.
 

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It is not a "chip" of the sort that some cars use - within the key. It is merely a resistor built into the switch itself that the ECM senses with the key in the "ON" position. It is a meager attempt to offer some protection against hotwiring the ignition system.

The two wires lacking on your aftermarket switch are the ones for the internal resistor - the Org/Red and Blk/Wht wires.

It has been my experience that the tumbler set from the aftermarket switch will not fit into the OEM switch housing. They are different just enough to discourage part swapping. On the other hand, there are aftermarket switches out there that do contain the resistor, and they are plug-n-play. However, you would be back to square one with unmatched keys for the tank and ignition.

One more thing, at least with the aftermarket switch I used, the key would physically not fit into the OEM tumbler set. The ridges and slots along the length of the key were different. So that ruled out filing down the tumbler discs in the fuel cap lock to fit the new key.

You could follow the route that tlsgazza describes, or solder a 100 ohm resistor into the loom to keep the ECM happy, and use the 4-wire aftermarket ignition switch you now have.
Thanks for that. I meant resistor of course. :laugh
 
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