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Discussion Starter #21
Probably not; Fluid physics isn't something I was particularly good at!! :devious

All I know is it works :D
 

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Probably not; Fluid physics isn't something I was particularly good at!! :devious

All I know is it works :D
Me neither.
That's why there are a lot of "probably" and "I think" in my post. :laugh
 

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When I've got the stuff I'll do some testing. After a night with a tied down lever it seems there's less travel needed to get the brakes to apply. With the streched fingers it might just feel firmer, because it's harder to squeeze in?

What about the possible air pockets in the connection between the two calliper parts?
 

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Good writeup with excellent pictures!!
I have some remarks:
1) you can easily get the pistons out using compressed air. Just put a piece of wood/rag between them before blowing them out! Be careful!
2) Using special brake assembly paste certainly helps that the piston move freely right from the beginning.
3) You should NOT use copper grease when bolting together aluminium with a steel bolt!! It will cause corriosion in the long term ("battery effect"). If you want to use grease, use aluminium anti size like Loctite 8150. No grease will be better than copper grease for the caliper halves bolts!
4) The 6 pot calipers are difficult to bleed. I had good results when I tried to first get air out of a caliper prior to connecting it to the line. Or in other words fill the caliper with fluid until there is no air trapped in there anymore. You will be amazed how much air comes out of there when shaking/turning/knocking/heating the caliper again and again.

Greetings
Rufer
 

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Inspired by reading this, and the fact that my wheel felt siezed when i tried to move it, followed the plan, nice write up, but still managed to shag 3 pistons getting them out.
Have cleaned everything up, don't fancy risking the ones with surface marks on them after i had to resort to the big grips and not enough cloth in the jaws, so looking at options:
1. Lots of used ones on bay for about £100 supposed to be in good condition with later ally pistons.
2. Get replacemnt set of pistons for one (with seals) for £75 and seals for other at £35 and end up with one caliper running ally pistons, the other stainless.
3. Stop messing about and spend the £150 and do both with ally pistons.

Anyone any experience with the ally pistons, they sound like an improvement in stopping the sticking pistons (reckon i was running with a pair of 2 pots by the lack of movement when i did the strip!

Thought?

Chris
 

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Get a set of as new calipers from Speedking in the market place.

Greetings
Rufer
 

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Why not rub down your pistons with emery cloth and see how they come up? if not good enough, rub down with 800,1000 and 1500grit wet and dry. then re polish. New seal kit for £50+/- for everything except half seals (£2each).

I recently did a set, and gave him a bonus by spraying them with ceramic paint to tidy them a little. :thumbup
 

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Thanks Rufer, good tip, think i got the last set he had in.

Chris, tried rubbing down but just not happy that they won't fail again as at least one has quite a deep mark, and for £50 more than the seals I get a set with the ally pistons in blingy gold, saving me a paint job.

If anyone else shags a piston in, give me a shout as after the new one arrives I will have some spares you can have....

Chris
 

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great write up:hail
just a little tip that worked well for me,
when removing the pistons, use circlip pliers to grip the inside/hollow of the piston. no chance of damage to the piston.
hope this helps:thumbup
 

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Hey TLR Junkie Thanks for such a detail overhaul of the brake calipers, just overhaul my 98 TLR by using his direction, the only thing I used a spark plug plires to pull the piston pods out to make sure I didn't score the piston. Big props to you man.
 

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I get the air out in the sistem by my way, because the vacum "sh.t" didnt work. I clean the brake sistem, seals and pistons every jear before the season and it is very simple, put use the special brake vaselin to rebuilt the calipers and then you have great working brakes for longer! :)
 

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This is an excellent guide to renovating Tokico six pot calipers. However there is another way to do this. Remove the six pots, drive to the nearest recycling centre with them and throw them in the container marked 'metal'. On return to home go onto ebay and buy radial calipers and forks to match! Result: brakes that work properly and can be bled easily. Sorry TLR Junkie this is no reflection on your great guide to renovation!!
 

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Discussion Starter #35
To be honest with the frequency with which they require attention, and the cost of the pads compared to the four pot Nissins, you might well have a point there :lol
 

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Ha Ha, Actually I have kept my six pots on the basis that one day I might wish to return my TL to standard spec, as it may be worth more should I sell it. Best mod I have done was the longer swing arm. It's what Suzuki should have done in the first place rather than fit the heavy and agricultural steering damper.
 

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Doppler, how much longer did you go with your swingarm, comparing the middle of the stock adjustment range to where you run it now? With stock wheels my TLS is really difficult to turn even without any damper.
 

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I fitted a GSXR750K2 swing arm and it is 26mm longer. I also fitted a 190 Pirelli Rosso Corsa rear tyre and had to add another link to the chain to accommodate the extra dia of the tyre. The result is that the wheelbase is now approximately 40mm longer than stock. This has totally transformed the bike. Some time ago I also threw away the horrible Suzuki steering damper and fitted a Hyperpro adjustable one. This helps the low speed handling a lot. Hope that this helps.
 

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Huh? The number of links in the chain has nothing to do with the diameter of the tire. Isn't a 190 the stock size? And tire diameter doesn't affect the wheelbase at all. So how does adding a swingarm 26mm longer (about 1 inch) get your wheelbase 40mm longer? The wheelbase is the distance between the wheel centers (axles).

It sounds like you extended your swingarm a very conservative 1 inch, which sounds like a prudent adjustment of front/rear balance. And I loved the Hyperpro RSC on ny first TLS. So many people have 12 inch extensions which seems like way too much except for drag racing which the TL doesn't really do very well. Mine is adjustable from approximately +1/2" to about +6" and I'm starting long and can cut the chain further until I'm happy. I suspect it may end up at about +3.
 

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I think you are misunderstanding me. When I fitted the longer swing arm I of course fitted a new longer chain. Some time after, I fitted a 190/55 tyre in place of the 180 tyre. This required the wheel to move further backwards on the adjusters as the crown of the tyre was touching the swing arm. The result of the longer swing arm and then pulling the wheel further back on the chain adjusters has resulted in a net increase in wheelbase of around 40mm. The addition of a link in the chain was to enable the wheel to be pulled back. Hope that this now makes sense!!
 
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