TLZone Forums banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This thread details how to check tappet clearances only. I will write up the adjustment as a separate thread once I've finished the job (waiting on shims to be delivered). I've chosen to do it this way as merely checking clearances is more straight-forward than adjusting them so it may well be that people would like to check their own, and farm out the work of adjustment if required. Made sense to me anyway :thumbup

Tappet clearances should only be checked with the engine completely cold, otherwise thermal expansion will throw out the clearances. Ideally you want to leave the bike overnight before starting out on the job. I rode my bike home from work on Friday and didn't start the work in this thread until the following morning :)

Valve clearances are different depending on whether it is the inlet or exhaust valves that are being checked. Tolerances are 0.10~0.20mm on in the inlet, and 0.20~0.30mm on the exhaust:


I'm using my trusty Abba Superbike stand during the procedure:


Remove the bellypan and side fairings:


The seat:


The steering damper:



Now the manual says to raise the tank, but access is easier if you just remove the tank completely. To this end you'll need two bits under the pillion seat. The tank prop and rubber bung for the fuel tank:


Tank cover removed:


You can see how tight access is to the rear cylinder with the tank raised:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Disconnect the quick release fuel line:


And quickly release the other one and use the rubber bung to stop fuel flow:


Disconnect drain hose and wiring:


Release the tip-over sensor from its bracket:


And the tank lifts away, increasing access considerably:


Disconnect cam position sensor wiring, and pull the plug cap off the rear plug:


The rear plug was ok. Gap was near enough 0.7mm. It's been in there for 13,000 miles. I'll be fitting new ones as part of the service, with the specified CR9EK twin electrode plugs:


Remove horn:



And remove circled bolts to allow the front radiators to be lowered:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
This exposes the front cylinder:


The front plug was a little less 'happy'. The gap was just out of spec and had rusted badly. I was suffering water ingress in torrential (and by that I mean almost biblical proportions) wet weather coming home from Austria last month:


Back to the rear cylinder, remove the breather hose (all hoses and wiring I've removed are cable-tied out of the way). The four bolts retaining the engine cover need removing to allow the cover to come off.


Access is pretty tight to the rear two, so you might need to improvise. I used an allen key and 6mm spanner:


With a piece of ally tubing:


To slacken them off. My bike's on 20,500 miles or so and I bought the bike with around 4,000 on it. These covers have probably never been off since the bike left the factory. Once done, remove the rear engine cover. It's stamped 'REAR':


Cover removed:


Repeat for the rear cover:


Now we need access to the timing inspection cap, which is behind the battery box. Remove the battery cover:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
And battery:


There are three bolts securing it (one of mine is missing). Both of my two were quite heavily corroded and I needed six-sided impact sockets & a 20" breaker bar to shift one of them:


This is the inspection cap:


And a bolt behind this cover is used to turn the crank. These caps are made of cheese and round easily. Care must be taken to remove them:


A bit of oil and a few taps with a rubber mallet got mine moving without damage. It's a casing-off job to fix if you muller this cap:


Now the front cylinder needs timing up to TDC on compression to measure the clearance. Turn the crank through the cap until FT is visible through the inspection cap as pictured:



The cam lobes will look like this:


Allowing the clearance to be measured with feelers:


Draft up a sketch of the 8 valves:


TC(m) = Tappet Clearance as measured
S(f) = Shim, fitted
S(r) = Shim, required
TC = Tappet Clearance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Measure the four valves on No. 1 cylinder, then rotate the engine 270 degrees so that No. 2 is at TDC and repeat (RT is visible through the inspection cap when No. 2 is timed up) for the rear cylinder. No pics of this bit, sorry.

I use colour coding to denote what's in spec and what isn't. Red means out of spec. Blue means in spec. For reference, my bike is around 6,000 past its first inspection due at 14,500 miles. Three exhaust valves are out of spec (too tight) and one is right on the minimum. All four inlets are in spec, although three are close to minimum as well:


For merely checking clearances, that's it (apart from re-assembly which is the reverse of removal). Three of my eight valves NEED adjusting, but I am going to do all eight as I'll have the cams out anyway. As you can see, to check clearances doesn't require cam shaft removal and aside from tackling access / corrosion issues, isn't particularly difficult.

A similar thread will follow for the adjustment process once I've finished :thumbup

P.s. that chart was modified slightly later on as I decided it was easier to work from left to right on both sides :)


More on that in the next instalment :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Your timing couldn't have been more perfect. I'm glad I held off a day on installing my motor. I won't have any access issues doing this beforehand, thus making my life and build that much easier. Thanks to you sir!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Cheers guys :) Shims should be arriving today hopefully so I'll be finishing off tonight with a write-up afterwards or Wednesday, depending on time and how easily it all goes back together :lol

One thing that occurred to me, I didn't actually make any reference to how I used the feeler gauges, so here's how it's done (although the motor's different - this is an SRAD 600):

Feeler gauges are precision machined slips of metal of a very precise thickness. The thickness of each is stamped on them, in this case in increments of mm:


There are only a limited number of different thicknesses. The ones you have though enable you to obtain most thicknesses by combining two or more. More complete sets are probably available - this is a basic set from Halfords and was relatively inexpensive. You need to look after them properly; wipe them before and after each use, and keep them oiled to keep rust at bay.

The SRAD exhaust valve clearance is the same as the TL - 0.2mm to 0.3mm. I start by using a 0.30 gauge:


Which doesn't fit between the top of the bucket and the cam lobe. The clearance is less than 0.30mm. Now I move to a 0.20mm gauge and it easily fits:


If I were just checking for clearances between tolerance, I could stop here with this one. The clearance is larger than 0.20mm and less than 0.30mm so it is within the tolerance specified. I want to know what the clearance is to the nearest 100th of a mm though, so I carry on with different sizes. I move to a 0.26mm gauge which is achieved by combining a .20mm and 0.06mm gauge:


This doesn't fit either, so now I know the clearance is between 0.20mm and 0.26mm:


So now I try 0.24mm by combining a 0.20mm and 0.04mm gauge:


This fits:


So now I know the clearance is between 0.24mm and 0.26mm. I make sure though by trying 0.25mm:


Which is a tight sliding fit:


So I know the clearance on this valve is 0.25mm, right in the middle of the specified clearance. I note this on a chart:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,263 Posts
Very good write up with great detailed pics dude. Nice one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
699 Posts
see, this is what us n00bs need

this should be insta stickied

so no need for any new gaskets?, or any of the sort...anything else to check while youre in this far?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The plugs come out to remove compression, so it's a good opportunity to check plug gaps and condition. Also things like the fuel lines as you have the tank raised (look for any signs of perishing etc.). You'll also see in some of the pics that I'm draining the oil - I'm changing the oil & filter as part of the service. It's worth checking that for contaminants, as well as having a look at the magnet on the sump bolt. After the valves are checked, part of the adjustment process is balancing the throttle bodies and re-calibrating the TPS, but that will be covered in the next thread.

AFAIK there's no need to replace the cover gaskets unless they're obviously damaged; certainly it's not something I've ever done on GSX-R's. Oil splashes around under there but it's not exactly under high pressure so if the gasket's in good condition, the mating surface clean and the cover bolts tightened correctly with the gasket properly located, it shouldn't leak.

My shims didn't turn up yesterday which was annoying - postie has them (according to the tracking number) and they should have been here yesterday so why they weren't I don't know. I'm due up in Birmingham tomorrow morning so I'm running out of time to get it back together :lol If I don't get mine running I'll be taking a trip up there on the wife's SRAD 600. I don't mind going up on that, but a) it's not my bike and b) I kinda prefer the litre engine on the motorways!

The adjustment thread should turn up by the end of the weekend anyway :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
yes!yes! plenty of pics and every step well documented please! I to will be doing this soon and I sure cant afford shop prices.thank you so much for doing this.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top