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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I borrowed my cousin's trailer so I could tow my bike to my next track day on the 29th. I hope I don't come off sounding like a dummy but I need advice on how to properly anchor my bike down on the trailer. Pictorials would help greatly.

The trailer has no wheel chocks and it's mainly used to haul 2 quads. I have 4 ratchet style tie-downs and 3 regular pull tension style tie-downs. Some questions I have are as follows:

do I want to put the bike as far up to the front of the trailer as possible or to the rear of the trailer?

When strapping it down do I want to use the kickstand or do I want to have it anchored only by the straps and have the bike stand straight?

Even though trackday is 1 week away can I strap my bike down on the trailer and let it sit with the suspension compressed for that long?

Once I have it strapped sown do I leave the bike in neutral or should I have it in gear?

I cannot do any alterations to the trailer because as I said, it's not mine.

Thanks in advance for the input.
 

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I would probably pull it all the way to the front.

Here's how I do it. To tie it down I'd somehow secure the front wheel so it can't turn (I have a wheel chock in my trailer) then loop a strap around the lower tripple on each side and away at as shallow an angle as your tie down points will allow. I've always done it kick-stand up as I feel its a better way to go. Then a couple straps from the back but they don't need to be too tight. Just enough to keep the rear end from sliding/hopping sideways, the front straps will secure the bike from tipping over.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you :thumbup
 

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What Bike Pilot said. However usually ideally you want your weight centered over the axle so as to reduce tounge weight, but in the case of a bike, it helps to keep it from moving around if it's all the way forward.

If you have a rear stand, I usually use that. Helps keep the bike stable and aids the tie down process.

Don't leave your forks compressed that long. I usually tie mine down in advance but don't pull them down tight, just enough to hold it upright and then tighten them down right before leaving.

Basically when the bike is tied down, make sure all the straps are tight and then grab hold of the bike and give it a good yank in all directions. If it doesn't move then you've done good.

Remember also, too many tiedowns is better than too little. You "Could" tie it down with two tie downs on the front pulling forward, but what happens if one of them breaks? :O I usually use a minimum of four. I've had one break before and nothing bad happened.
 

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Very true about toung weight, but keep in mind you want some toung weight totally neutral can get unstable. I've always towed with trucks and never really worried about having the weight too far foward - it will be very stable, justmore weight on the tow vehicle.

From a practical matter, I assume the trailer has some sort of metal rail accross the front. This would probably be a convient thing to put the front tire against and strap it to in order to prevent the bike rolling foward and the front wheel from turning.

have fun
 

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on a trailer, with a tow vehicle!

just joking, the obvious was already stated. BP and Jasen have probably hauled more bikes for more miles than any 25 of us put together.
 

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All the way forward for sure. There's more of a chance that braking forces will be higher than acceleration so there's less chance of it trying to go somewhere.

With no chock or rail, I'd put it in on an angle so the front wheel is wedged in a corner and try and tie it down there because if the front can't move left to right it's more stable.

If you're going to use the trailer semi regulary why don't you make a removable rail for the centre, even if its some 4X2 nailed to a plywood bottom or something and slide it in. Put some wings on it so it stays centred or get some plywood the same size as the railer floor. :dunno
 

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foght801 said:
just joking, the obvious was already stated. BP and Jasen have probably hauled more bikes for more miles than any 25 of us put together.
This is probably true, however combining mine and BP's miles together would only leave me in the end with maybe 5-10 percent of that total. :coocoo
 

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What was said already. Don't use generic ratchet tie downs on the front though, I only trust my bikes to Ancra MC tie downs :hail

You can make a poor man's bike chock out of 2X4s fastened to the trailer. You need something to keep the front wheel from turning. Use the canyon Dancers offered.

If you wind up towing it a lot, get one of these babies. They are uncheap at $215 or so, but offer complete peace of mind. Plus you can use it in the pits :)

http://www.indysuperbike.com/customer/product.php?productid=112102
 

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gixxerjasen said:
This is probably true, however combining mine and BP's miles together would only leave me in the end with maybe 5-10 percent of that total. :coocoo
Yeah, but 90% of my bike towing miles are of dirt bikes in bike shoes (they totally rock for MX bikes - no tie downs needed) so you probably actually have more exp strapping down a street bike than I do. I've probably got about 1-2k miles of street bike towing not counting family trips ( when we were traveling around dirt biking all over we often took my dad's R100RT with us for local transportation, pizza runs etc).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK I strapped it down so I could see how stable it is. I'll loosen the straps until the day before the trackday. How does my tie down job look? Anything I'm missing?







 

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Perfect:thumbup

You'll have a bit more weight on the tong than really necessary, but that won't hurt anything. If you were towing with a really really small car you might be better off moving the bike back on the trailer (which would be a pita because you'd have to come up with something to tie it againts. Looks like your tow vehicle is plenty sturdy and given that I'd tie it down just as you have:cool
 

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Only one other suggestion... check the points where the straps touch the metal frame on the trailer, you may want to place a piece of thick rubber/leather/garden hose scrap/ around where there is contact, just an added measure of protection to make sure the vibration of road travel does not "saw" through your straps. been there done that. :banghead
 
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