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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks to all , finally have had the time to clean the injectors and re-assemble. Bingo , bike now purring like a pussycat. The final diagnosis was a combination of many little problems, gummy fuel tank and faulty fuel pump and varnished injectors and sticky clutch switch the main contributors. Still it was a great learning experience and great way to get to know my new bike. Also fixed 3 indicators all faulty wire connectors, replaced with bullet joins. One quick question, approxiamately what temperature should the thermos fan kick in ? I have idled to 75 degrees and it still hasn't kicked in ?
 

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Thanks to all , finally have had the time to clean the injectors and re-assemble. Bingo , bike now purring like a pussycat. ..... One quick question, approxiamately what temperature should the thermos fan kick in ? I have idled to 75 degrees and it still hasn't kicked in ?
Congrats! 馃憤 Good progress.

The ECM doesn't even access the 'Warm Fuel Map' until 176掳F (80掳C). Typical operating temperature is 185F to 190F (85C-88C). The fans do not turn on until 212F (100C) degrees, IIRC.

However, aftermarket fan switches are available that will turn them on at around 195F. Then, there's always the manual switch option.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Congrats! 馃憤 Good progress.

The ECM doesn't even access the 'Warm Fuel Map' until 176掳F (80掳C). Typical operating temperature is 185F to 190F (85C-88C). The fans do not turn on until 212F (100C) degrees, IIRC.

However, aftermarket fan switches are available that will turn them on at around 195F. Then, there's always the manual switch option.
Thanks mate, I think I only have 1 fan ? will have a good look later
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Fl code is a low oil code. Look at the oil view window. Might need to add some oil or could be the pickup/pump.
seems all good now mate, purring like a pussycat, no FI code now , thanks anyway and to everyone who helped me. Great group of brothers right here ! And maybe a sister or 2 ??
 

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Glad you are running strong!

Just for future viewers, the red light on the cluster serves two purposes... It is a low oil pressure! (Not volume) light. And a diagnostic light.

It illuminates when key on, not running, because the oil pressure (again, not volume) is low. Which it is, since the engine isn't in fact running and oil pressure is at, well, 0 psi.

So once the engine starts, the pressure should be adequate and the light should go out.

If it illuminates, you should not run the engine. Either because you have insufficient oil pressure (bad) or you have an engine condition (also bad).

The ECM isn't like that in a car. It doesn't receive constant 12v. It "dies" every time you key off. So any code that came up is lost into the stratosphere. So...

If you are throwing a code you have a few options...

1. Have a spare key. Keep the bike on (but not running) if it throws a code. Check the code.
2. Never put a pillion seat or hump on and bridge the connector when needed. (Impractical) then check the code.
3. Put a switch on the white gang plug in the boot/trunk/compartment. And check the code.
4. Don't worry about it (also not advised). Then never check the code.


To each their own. Happy quarantine!
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Glad you are running strong!

Just for future viewers, the red light on the cluster serves two purposes... It is a low oil pressure! (Not volume) light. And a diagnostic light.

It illuminates when key on, not running, because the oil pressure (again, not volume) is low. Which it is, since the engine isn't in fact running and oil pressure is at, well, 0 psi.

So once the engine starts, the pressure should be adequate and the light should go out.

If it illuminates, you should not run the engine. Either because you have insufficient oil pressure (bad) or you have an engine condition (also bad).

The ECM isn't like that in a car. It doesn't receive constant 12v. It "dies" every time you key off. So any code that came up is lost into the stratosphere. So...

If you are throwing a code you have a few options...

1. Have a spare key. Keep the bike on (but not running) if it throws a code. Check the code.
2. Never put a pillion seat or hump on and bridge the connector when needed. (Impractical) then check the code.
3. Put a switch on the white gang plug in the boot/trunk/compartment. And check the code.
4. Don't worry about it (also not advised). Then never check the code.


To each their own. Happy quarantine!
yep a bit awkward carrying a spare key, I am thinking of securing a hidden key on the bike, so if a code ever comes on when bike running , I can check it, I now keep a piece of bridging wire in my tool kit. However I am hoping I now have a smooth run. Moral of my situation, is to try ride the bike at least once a month or kick it over for 5 minutes.
 
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