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TLOTM Sept. '08
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This mod applies equally to most modern bikes regardless of the marque/model.

The defining factor regardless of motorcycle brand/year/model is that your bike has the discreet 3-phase Stator/Generator and Rectifier/Regulator arrangement

This is primarily about upgrading the standard equipment Regulator/Rectifier with a more efficient component. You can do this in event of failure rather than replace with the same stock component, or you can even do as a preventive measure if desired.

As a prologue, let me introduce a basic diagnostic troubleshooting process to determine whether you have a charging system failure.

A good Multi-Meter is a pre-requisite.


Record your battery voltage under the follow conditions
1) Ignition off, unloaded battery.
2) Ignition on, headlights on, not running
3) Bike started, running at idle

For condition 1, should be at least in the high 12.x range if fully charged.

In condition 2, your voltage should not drop much below 12.0 at worst. (It may continue to drop – hopefully slowly! – as your lights will be discharging it. However this should be a slow decline)
If it does drop immediately into the 11’s, your battery is insufficiently charged – if it was just charged from a battery charger however, then it indicates your battery no longer has sufficient capacity to retain charge/supply current to load and should be replaced.

Condition 3 is what we are most interested in with respect to charging capability.
Voltage should be at least in the 13’s at all engine rpm. You may detect it will fall off slightly as you raise engine rpm. This is not atypical performance. A simple mod that can enhance your charging voltage to the battery can be achieved by this modification outlined in this thread. That should give you performance in the 14V+ range.

What if you have less than 13V?
First thing to check is the fuse – this may have a different number depending on which model you have, so I will refrain from identifying a specific one. Ask on the forum for your particular model which one you should check if in doubt. It will be a 30A fuse however.

Next, examine the wires and connectors between the stator output and the R/R input (three wire harness and connectors) – are these charred/melted due to excessive heating? That is an early indication that you may have a shorted diode or SCR in the R/R. The regulator is a shunt device and if one of those components goes bad, then it will pull maximum current from the stator. This may not be immediately apparent as you will possibly still see in excess of 12V at idle (possible higher at other rpm) but it will be obvious from the heat and associated burning smell!
This is an unfortunate situation – there is strong possibility that the stator will also be killed by this type of primary failure, if not detected immediately and continued to run in this condition.
A ‘cold’ resistance check for shorted diode/SCR:
Unplug both input & output plugs from R/R;
With your meter set to read resistance (use a diode test if the your multi-meter has one), test from each pin of the three pin plug, to both the red & black wired pins of the 4-pin plug; NONE of these should read short circuit (zero resistance); depending which way you bias the test leads, you may get some reading (from the forward bias of the component) but it must absolutely not be a short. If you see a short on any of these readings the R/R is defective.

Next, do a resistance check on the stator (check at the cable connector going back towards the stator itself).
Measure between the three respective combinations of the three pins:
1-2
2-3
3-1
This time each of these should measure almost short circuit (very low resistance in order or about 1 ohm)
Also check from any one pin to the engine ground terminal – this should not read any indication – maximum resistance or open-circuit.
If you read ‘short’ in that last test, then your stator is bad.

Check the AC voltage output from the stator with engine running:
Leave stator disconnected from the R/R and start the engines.
With meter set to read AC Volts check
1-2
2-3
3-1
All three should be the same value – any significant difference of one reading will indicate a bad phase and the stator is probably defective.
At idle this should be ~ 25V and rise to ~ 70V at 5K rpm. I almost hesitate to use absolute numbers here as this can be different between models and test equipment.
What you are looking for is same between phases and like increase on each phase as rpm increases. If one of the phases illustrates a value that is lower than the other two, that is string indication of a burned stator coil.
If any of the above tests raises suspicion, pull the cover & inspect the stator. It is simple to do and can set your mind at ease by seeing what it looks like. Hopefully NOT with 1/3 of it a black charred mess!

If you have to replace the stator and R/R, especially because of a shorted R/R and excess current drain, be especially careful to ensure that your wiring has not been compromised. If the wiring has been fired, then you will continue to have issues and potential failure of those expensive components which have just been replaced! Replace any cable &/or connector plug that is not in optimum condition.

If you need a new stator, I heartily endorse Ricks Motorsport Electrics as a supplier of quality components with great customer service.

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Now on to the alternative R/R replacement

- as aforementioned this is a good preventive upgrade measure with a better component, not necessarily limited to repalcement on failure. Either way, process is the same.

Best widely available R/R on the market today is the Shindengen FH012AA used on the late (06+) Yamaha FJR, 07+ Yamaha R1 among others
What makes it better is that is a MOSFET controlled device rather than the crude SCR type that is on most of the Suzuki series and also is a 50A rated device.
MUCH better voltage regulation and runs cooler too due to much more efficient control.
The SCR shunt type consumes more energy in the Regulator itself than the bike is using and dumps a ton of current into the heatsink (feel yours & just see how hot those things run!!!! - don't touch it - you'll burn yourself - seriously!) The problem is exacerbated because their efficiency goes even lower when they get HOT so it's a viscious circle. Heat is the number 1 killer of these devices.
Incidentally its a misconception that these thing work harder with increased load i.e. higher-wattage lights, heated vests etc - actually, the higher the load on the output, the less work the regulator does in dumping that excess energy and will actually run cooler!!

You can install this unit on ANY bike that has discreet three-phase stator and R/R arrangement.





These are starting to show up on the EBay market - there are many other bike models, simplest check is to use something like Ron Ayers to find all the match models. (Even Grizzly ATV uses it) I paid $32 plus shipping for mine. They are regularly available for < $50
Have it on the TL, and just converted the Triumph and ultimately the SV (which will receive the FH010 shown below).

The connector plugs are quite different of course - have been unable to find a source for these just yet - but simple female spade terminals push directly over each of the pins.
The best connection method IMO is to run the output leads directly to the battery (the '+' via a 30A fuse) - that minimizes any losses & you get the 'sensing' voltage directly at the battery terminals.

This is on a Triumph Sprint (coutesy of my good friend OldnDumb) - my TL & S3/Daytona installations are further down.



Another alternative that has MOSFET control, is the FH010 - this is used on late-model Kawasakis (ZZX10 /14) and also some R1 & FJR in the 2005/2006 range. It has slightly lower power rating than the 12 but still plenty for the SV. That 010 unit has same form factor as the 012.

Here is the end profile of the FH012: I'll post up some pics of it installed on my TL & S3 later.




Here's another one:

Most of the late model CBRs utilize the same type of R/R and the latest CBR1000 looks like it uses the FH0014 which apppears to be like FH012 but with different connectors for the Honda.

The pre '08 CBR1000 unit is also a Shindengen MOSFET unit. FH008EB - the 'F' designates it is an FET model - the Shunt/SCR ones by same manufacturer have an 'S' prefix. These have flying leads with connectors that can be removed & replaced with the Triumph or Suzuki ones - I prefer connecting directly to battery however.
Unfortunately I can't find exact specs on the FH008 unit but is still an excellent choice given it uses the MOSFET technology. Due to more compact size I suspect this is a 35A unit rather then the 50A FH012 model.
This is a good choice for smaller bikes - I used this one myself on the Mrs SV650 - although note that Honda also used this on their CBR1000 - and at 35A is still comparably rated alongside most SCR types



My preference in connecting these is to eliminate the original bike harness wiring from the output entirely - connect 12ga wires directly from the output connector of the R/R to the battery terminals - female spade on the R/R end and ring terminal for the battery. For the positive lead, there should be an in-line 30A fuse on that leg.

I'm trying to find a source for the Furakawa waterproof connectors that should mate to it - have a supplier looking into that currently. The spades give good enough electrical connection but offer no strain relief - should not be an issue where its located and they're on there good & tight. (a little 'squeeze' on the female spades ensure a snug tight fit).

Connectors would be great though, no doubt.

Here's the pictures of the FHO12AA on my TLS:

It was just neater back there in that location on the 'S' vs the OEM which is further dforward & exposed below the tail plastics; although the heatsink fins are not in the the prime airflow (& oriented 90 from ideal), this thing barely breaks a sweat on temp relative to the SCR models, so I'm not too worried about it. After I've been out for an extended run I'll take a temp reading off it for you.
I also relocated the ambient air pressure sensor to accommodate.

The meter indicates the performance at idle - it was actually fluctuating a little at idle down to about 14.00 even (stil less than 2/10 of a Volt folks!), but became solid by 2000 rpm - revved to about 6K barely made much no difference right through that range, increased just off idle to 14.25V and held there pretty much. This thing has excellent regulation. :thumbup

Note that it also features a 'slow start' mode which initially caught me by surprise.
When you first start the bike, the output remains at battery voltage then slowly ramps to the full output - takes about 10 seconds or so to reach 14+.

So if you install one of these, be prepared for that feature!









Here is the install of the Shindengen FH012AA on my Triumph Daytona/Speed Triple

A couple of notes on this one;
I found that the connector plugs between the stator output & the intermediate connector harness was in pretty bad shape; clearly had not been making good contact & arcing through the plugs.
I decide to eliminate the plugs & hard solder the connections.
At the R/R end of that intermediate harness, I eliminated the plug and using female spades, as before, connected the three phases directly to the input of the FH012AA.
For the output, these connections run via 10 ga wire directly to the battery; the +ve via a 30A fuse in a waterporoof connector.
I have some strain relief in place by virtue of the cable-ties snugged up on the wires to prevent it being pulled through the feedthrough holes.
Note also that I have used a copper heatsink, previously empoyed in my former set-up with the OEM R/R. This is less necessary with the Shindengen R/R but is still an added safety measure of insurance. Notice that I also cut some slots in the cooling fins of the heatsink, since I actually have this mounted transverse to the 'normal' natural airflow. I also used a heatsink compound paste (available at electronic supply - like RadioShack or Maplins) between the R/R and the heatsink to improve the thermal conduction between the two media.

In testing, you can immediately see the difference - regardless of the engine rpm, the output voltage remains constant. This shows that it is a TRUE regulator vs the crude SCR shunt of the OEM. Typical behaviour on the OEM SCR R/R is that the voltage will actually decrease as rpm increases - this seems counter-intuitive to many peoples logical thought, but it is because the R/R is actually sinking more as the generated voltage increase.

Here is the new R/R mounted on the Copper HeatSink:





Here is the testing validation - bike is at idle but voltmeter actually reads consistently regardless of rpm.



And finally all buttoned up again with the tail skin back on. You can see the R/R under the plastics on the right side of bike. (Top of pic)
It is located in the air-stream while bike is mobile.
You can also see the fuse-holder in center-screen which is the connection between battery and R/R +ve output






Some other retrofit suggestions:

Here is another consideration when wiring the FH012 - especially if your cable or connectors are already damaged by a shorted R/R.
Make a new interconnect harness between the stator output connector plug and the Regulator Input

You can eliminate a connection point completely and use quality grade wire to go directly from the stator interconnect plug to the spade terminals for input to the R/R. You will need to utilize the connector plug off your old R/R or alternatively off your OEM harness. Push the pins out of the plug and solder your new wires directly onto the pins. You could also just eliminate the stator output connector plug if you choose and remove that plug & solder the wires directly at that point also.

For anyone that is uncomfortable soldering you can always consider using 'chocolate block' - terminal strip. Much better than crimp connectors! You just need to be sure you waterproof that afterwards.





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Updated:

The Furukawa connectors for the Shindengen R/R (FH010 or FH012) are now available

Get them at Eastern Beaver.

http://easternbeaver.com/Main/Elec__Products/Connectors/Sealed/FKWH/fkwh.html


Vendor will shortly be supplying pre-crimped harnesses as an alternative to DIY - he uses professional grade crimp tools for these connectors so that might be the route to go .

* Note that if you got an FH014 off late model CBR1000, these connectors will NOT fit that R/R.

I can also suggest the following to complement your installation while you're in 'the store' :
.

Metri-Pack Fuse holder

- http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/Elec__Products/Fuseholders/fuseholders.html



Harness connector plug to inteconnect to the stator cable
.

About half-way down page - http://www.easternbeaver.com/Main/Elec__Products/Connectors/250_Connectors/250_connectors.html

Sumitomo Connector Set 3PM250K



Note that even if your model bike uses different connector, you will receive the mating half anyway
Simple task to just push out pins from connector and re-insert in new shell - or reterminate completelywith the new pins.

* If you have enough cable of course there is no requirement per se for this intermediate connector - just remove old plug from harness and terminate wires directly onto the Furukawa.
Using this intermediate connector will of course preserve integrity of your main wiring harness for those desiring a reversible plan.

Configure your plug n play harnesses like this:

 

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That is an excellent post. Definitely will solve the charging problems of any bike not just a TL. Have to be careful of the copper though around where I live if it becomes known you have pure copper the metal thieves will steal your bike for the piece of copper. Also if you want even more cooling capability for the regulator you can bolt a Pentium cooling fan across the top of the heat sink and parrallel wire it to the output of the regulator and it will only come on when the bike is running works well as I had on my TLR.
 

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TLOTM Sept. '08
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Discussion Starter #4
....Have to be careful of the copper though a.... if you want even more cooling capability for the regulator you can bolt a Pentium cooling fan across the top of the heat sink ...
The copper heatsink is actually a hold-over from my original SCR R/R - definitely not necessary with the MOSFET R/R which runs much, much cooler.

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D'Ecosse :hail:hail:hail
 

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Also if you want even more cooling capability for the regulator you can bolt a Pentium cooling fan across the top of the heat sink and parrallel wire it to the output of the regulator and it will only come on when the bike is running works well as I had on my TLR.
If the out put of the R/R is wired direct to the battery, I would have thought that a fan wired in any way to this circuit would be live as battery isn't isolated from the R/R output via the ignition switch

I may be wrong but just thought i'd mention it?
 

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TLOTM Sept. '08
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Discussion Starter #8
If the out put of the R/R is wired direct to the battery, I would have thought that a fan wired in any way to this circuit would be live as battery isn't isolated from the R/R output via the ignition switch ...I may be wrong but just thought i'd mention it?
I missed that myself but you are absolutely correct - regardless of whether OEM or modified per charging mod, battery is always directly connected to the R/R output, even with ignition off.
 

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I missed that myself but you are absolutely correct - regardless of whether OEM or modified per charging mod, battery is always directly connected to the R/R output, even with ignition off.
You are correct now I cannot remember exactly how I wired it as I did it a few years ago and have since sold the bike thought for sure it was just across the output of the regulator. Any way any switched 12 volt will work as the current draw is zip for the Pentium cooling fan.
 

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good lord
 

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double post. thanks again buddy. :) lost charging on terrys tl. nice upgrade.. :banana r/r was buried in the tail. fix on the way. tach mod's never missed a beat

n
 
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