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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a TLS crank and rods on ebay to throw in my spare TLR motor. They are out of a 2000 motor. When I go to Ron Ayers there are more than one option (part number) for the crank bearings. This is under the 2000 TLS section. They are also more than one option for the rod bearing. diff. thickness I guess? How do you know which ones are which?
http://www.ronayers.com/fiche/300_0293/crankshaft/crankshaft.cfm?man=su&groupid=12330&parent=12280
Can I use the crank bearings for a TLR motor? Which ones do
I use. I figured if the cranks are interchangeable this wouldn't be this hard to get bearings.:O
Also, Is Ron Ayers the best place to get gasket kits and stock piston rings or is there a cheeper place?
Thanks.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
come on fitchman, N2.:O Someones gotta know?
 

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pm adavis...

i had to ask him the same question when i bought my bearings and i dont remember which was which
 

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There are markings on the rods and the crank. Dont know if colour or numbers yet, i think numbers. In the factory repairing book, there are the codes explained, which means there You see that for example 122 You need the green bearings, for 123 the red..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ahh thank you.:) I have not recieved the crank yet, just won the auction on Friday. I will take a real close look at it.
I wish I knew that a TLS crank would work in a R motor a couple weeks ago, so I could of picked up the nice set that N2 was selling.:banghead
Well that took about 15 minites. GOTTA LOVE THE ZONE:) :hail
Thanks again.
 

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Well that took about 15 minites. GOTTA LOVE THE ZONE:) :hail
Took me 2 minutes to get my manual out and look it up...Took another 13 minutes to find a pic,resize it and upload it on Dial Up to photobucket and come back for the Edit. :laugh


All of the information needed is in the Workshop Manual so you gotta love that..Pages 3H - 9... 3H - 10... 3H - 11


What am i missing :dowhat :O

 

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YOU MEASURE! There is no other way. You do it with a mic and a inside tool. DO NOT COUNT ON COLOR CODES ECT TO BE RIGHT!
 

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in the service manual there is a page that describes how to tell what you have Vs what you need i believe it goes something like black,brown,green,or white on the crank and rods and then on the inside of the case i think on the thrust washer side there is a leter A,B,C stamped or cast into the case using this info and the manual you determine which berrings to use with what you are trying to put together...i will look in my manual and try to get info for you later...
 

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YOU MEASURE! There is no other way. You do it with a mic and a inside tool. DO NOT COUNT ON COLOR CODES ECT TO BE RIGHT!

You still have to have a workshop manual :coocoo .That is 90 % of the problem in general.

It is of little point if you do mic the parts only to set a clearance that is to large leading to bearing failure,so kind of a moot point.
Not to mention you still have to start somewhere based on the colour code and selection available.....You don't pull the right shell out of a hat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The service manual I have is not a factory Suzuki one. It's something like a Clymer or something? Gotta take a look at it. When I thought of this problem I was sitting here in my living room, not it my workshop were my book is. Sorry to put anybody out.:O
 

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You can find the factory manual online and print it at work LOL. There's also a guy on eBay selling illegal bootleg print-outs of the factory manual for cheap.

In the past I'd never used a mic except to check for specs like out-of-round, always used Plastigage for fitting bearings. Either tool is only as good as its user. Of course mics will work better if you know what you're doing and if they're calibrated. Should probably plastigage as a final check anyway, the stuff is really cheap. It's this plastic strip you put inside the bearing shell, then bolt down the bearing shell with the old bolts, take it apart, and hold it next to a chart...by measuring how wide the plastic strip squished it tells you exactly how much clearance you have. It works pretty well, they still teach the technique in schools, and it's really goof-proof, no cumulative error measuring the rod & journal & shell. Otherwise you have to mic at least the assebled rod/shell ID then the journal OD unless the book only goes by journal?? Whatever method you use to pick shell, should probably plastigage to see what you ended up with, and make sure the rod or bearing tolerances aren't cumulative. A great double-check at the least.

see halfway down this page:

http://www.debben.co.uk/acatalog/Click_here_to_view_race_spares_and_tools.html

If you plastigage rod big-ends make certain you push the rod down onto the journal first, shells should be dry (no oil) and guage plastic in the cap shell, between bearing and crank...all the play on the guage side. And DON"T let the rod move on the journal or the plastigage just becomes a messy smear!

If you plastigage a main on an inline multi, unless you're guaging all of them you assemble the others with a strip of business card in the shell to put all the play at all the caps in a row.
 

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i think the real manual is online here somewhere.
:O

you need the real one imho.
 

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Someone had mentioned on-list that they'd lapped rod caps to tighten rod clearnace. And I was concerned about that being out-of-round...

Now I hear that Clevite says you can mix the sizes of adjacent sizes of shells to achieve in-between sizes, always putting hte thicker shell in the rod or main and thinner shell in the cap. I learn something old every day.
 

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The service manual I have is not a factory Suzuki one. It's something like a Clymer or something? Gotta take a look at it. When I thought of this problem I was sitting here in my living room, not it my workshop were my book is. Sorry to put anybody out.:O
I don't think you were putting anyone out.(it was more of a generalization based on some 8 years posting on internet bike sites)

So the basic problem is solved.
Manual's like Clymer etc are ok for general maintenance but if you are going to do any advanced work you need the factory manual. (imho)

You will not be able to do your engine with out a copy or CD of it.
Anyone can bolt an engine together if they take their time,use the right tools and follow the instructions...The next step is to improve on what is there be that modifying or assembling to a higher spec (blueprinting) ie ..You would hardly take a set of rings from the packet and simply fit them to a piston.

It is no different to a simple wheel bearing.
It comes time to replace the bearing,most people would put whatever they took out back in. :O
Why would anyone want to put single shield bearings back in when double shielded are available for a few more cents...so there can come a time when even the manual becomes a guide in some matter's based on ones own opinions/idea's :laugh
 

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Someone had mentioned on-list that they'd lapped rod caps to tighten rod clearnace. And I was concerned about that being out-of-round...

Now I hear that Clevite says you can mix the sizes of adjacent sizes of shells to achieve in-between sizes, always putting hte thicker shell in the rod or main and thinner shell in the cap. I learn something old every day.
Lapping the part line will only increase the bearing crush,any decrease (distortion) in clearance is by default..Not forgetting the shells are not on a set radius free standing.
Mixed shells still retain the same crush (OD)..but it is not like you would combine a 10 under with a 20 given each journal is clearance ground to suit.
That is one of the problems with motorcycle engines with nitrided journals and selective bearing shells to suit a set (ish) diameter.

I can't remember the technical name but there is a possibility that the TL suffers from a problem where the journal become unstable within the ID of the bearing shells.
 

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I wish I knew that a TLS crank would work in a R motor a couple weeks ago, so I could of picked up the nice set that N2 was selling.:banghead
Well that took about 15 minites. GOTTA LOVE THE ZONE:) :hail
Thanks again.
N2's crank was from a '97 TLS, not compatible w/ late-model TLRs. The early TLS fed oil from only one side too. Later all TLS and TLR models were fed oil from both ends.
 

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i think the real manual is online here somewhere.
:O

you need the real one imho.
It's here :)

Up the top is says, User CP, Chat, Raffle, Subscriber Mail, The File Vault it's in the vault :thumbup
 
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