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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here I am basking in the glory of the Oregon Coast's liquid sun (34 inches since Nov. 1) when I decide to boost the pig up on stands and do some cleaning. It's 8:00pm and 38 degrees in garage and I go to fire it up. I give her a crank, she cold fires and stalls. Normal enough. I crank it again and one lung chuffs to life, all 498ccs of the rear slug. I give it 20 seconds thinking any second now number 1 will kick in and I'll have a full compliment of TL rumble. Not so much. I shut it down surprised, as this bike has never not started. I go about cleaning and 20 minutes later I try it again. Not so much as a fart. Smelling fuel, I give it an hour, then two. Cranks okay, but no fire. I start combing threads and maybe effective search engine use is not my strong suit, but I find nothing that matches my sitch. This morning I'm thinkin' she'll fire right up. Nada. I stop by NAPA on my lunch break and pick up two stock NGK plugs. I pull the skins, float the tank, drop the rads, pull the plugs and I'll be damned if there wasn't enough fuel soaked in those plugs to float the Exxon Valdez. In go the plugs, on goes a battery charger, I button it up and she roars to life.

So looking back on this windy dissertation, the short question is why did it choose to wash both plugs with fuel for no apparent reason?
 

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Probably the tired battery

Enough power to turn it over and work the pump and injectors, not enough left for a decent spark, plus it was probably cranking slower than normal too.

Yolu should only start an engine when you want to use it. Most (just about all) engine wear comes from cold starting / running / when warming up. Starting it up for the sake of starting it up just wears it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Probably the tired battery

Enough power to turn it over and work the pump and injectors, not enough left for a decent spark, plus it was probably cranking slower than normal too.

Yolu should only start an engine when you want to use it. Most (just about all) engine wear comes from cold starting / running / when warming up. Starting it up for the sake of starting it up just wears it out.
Mind blow. So the guys who ride all year wear their engines out by all the starting? :O
 

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i had this happen to me middle of the spring last year thought i would fire her up zip down to local presure wash clean her off go for a nice drynig ride.....well long story short after brieff hose down wouldn't start thought maybe still a little wet on the inner workings so i spent a little extra time drying and cleaning every litte area...not a water spot anywhere (about an hour) tried to start her again barley get her to fire on rear cylinder limped home took her all apart to find fouled front plug...my guess is that if you want to give her a good bath warm her to full running temp first this will prevent the water from causing any problems i always wash after rides now and no trouble since...good luck...
 

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Mind blow. So the guys who ride all year wear their engines out by all the starting? :O
You just being smart?

What I'm saying is, if you start the bike cold for no reason other than starting it, all you do is wear it out, you don't help it at all. :coocoo

Those who ride their bikes all year round wear them out faster than those that don't :coocoo Those that start them every week in winter for no reason wear their engines out as fast as the guys who ride all year round (probably faster as they keep adding moisture to the engine internals)
 

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90% of all engine wear occurs in the first few minutes after starting an engine...all i was saying is that it seems to me that if you let it reach running temp you will not create a fouling plug problem
 

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a frigged battery also plays with the ECU which can have it running really rich. happened to my gsxr, new battery and all that black smoke and fouled plugs were gone.
 

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A low battery can cause wet plugs on a failed starting attempt. And Steve's right, it makes no sense to start a bike if you aren't going to ride the thing or have another good reason (need to check oil level after a change or something). Start-up is where the most wear usually occures. That doesn't mean that riding every day is bad - if you put on 20k miles in a year or 20k miles in 10 years its not going to really change the life of the motor in terms of miles (except for the seldom ridden bike perhaps having seals dry up and stuff).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You just being smart?

What I'm saying is, if you start the bike cold for no reason other than starting it, all you do is wear it out, you don't help it at all. :coocoo

Those who ride their bikes all year round wear them out faster than those that don't :coocoo Those that start them every week in winter for no reason wear their engines out as fast as the guys who ride all year round (probably faster as they keep adding moisture to the engine internals)
Yeah, mostly being smart:coocoo
Bit of a stretch condemning getting the bike up to operating temp 2-3 times in 2 months vs. the remaining countless times while commuting and tracking over the next 10 months. Who said anything about every week? ???
I just thought it queer the plugs on these bikes fuel-soak with 11 volts in the battery. That's all. I rode 140 miles (225km) today with no problems. Maybe I'm way off base here, but could one say engine longevity would be diminished in the minutia by starting it a few times in the winter? What do you think Pilot? Safe statement?
BTW TLess Steve, what's your favorite scotch?
 

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Engine life is closer to the number of cold starts and not miles. That's why a commuter bikes (cars - trucks - etc) generally end up with higher mileage on them before they're worn out.

I only drink scotch and my favorite is the cheapest of the week :) I'm no connoisseur although I enjoy others expensive stuff too.
 

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Maybe I'm way off base here, but could one say engine longevity would be diminished in the minutia by starting it a few times in the winter? What do you think Pilot? Safe statement?
Probably a safe statement. I start mine an average of 2.5 times (stop for fuel every other day) a day every day, summer, winter, fall or whatever and it hasn't died yet. Its also ridden 40-50 miles after being started most every time, 51k miles at the moment and no troubles. I do agree with steve that most engine wear happens at cold start-up due to thick oil not circulating and the slight laps between parts moving around and oil pressure building up. For this reason I run a 5w-40 synthetic oil to help reduce wear on cold starts.

If it were me and I were storing a bike over the winter I probably wouldn't start it unless I wanted to go for a ride. I don't see what good it would do to start it up and not ride it, but I don't see it making a real difference either way:O
 
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