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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently bought a 98 tl1000r and they repacked the front brake master cylinder. I rode off and the front brakes had a lot of play until the engaged. You could pull the brake handle all the way to the handle bar with it udjusted at its highest setting. I took it back and they replaced the whole master cylinder, I picked it up today and there still seems to be a lot of play, it is slightly better but not what I am used to on my old Gsxr 750. There is a huge dead zone between the initial pull to when it engages. I was wondering if anyone had this problem, or knows how to fix it? I would hate to think this is just how the bike is. Thanks in advance for any help.
 

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So I recently bought a 98 tl1000r and they repacked the front brake master cylinder. I rode off and the front brakes had a lot of play until the engaged. You could pull the brake handle all the way to the handle bar with it udjusted at its highest setting. I took it back and they replaced the whole master cylinder, I picked it up today and there still seems to be a lot of play, it is slightly better but not what I am used to on my old Gsxr 750. There is a huge dead zone between the initial pull to when it engages. I was wondering if anyone had this problem, or knows how to fix it? I would hate to think this is just how the bike is. Thanks in advance for any help.
not bled right by the sounds of it.
 

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Assuming you have the standard 6-pots you will need:

braided lines.
Strip and clean the calipers taking care to get the crap out from behind the seals.
Reassemble carefully making sure all the pistons are moving freely. Red brake grease is a useful aid here.
Bleeding is always fun but generally pump them up with fluid, bleed them from the bottom as normal then push the pads back all the way to flush any remaining air back up the lines.
I would recommend EBC HH pads. They have a lot of meat on them when new so the pistons aren't too extended. It helps.

Once you've done all that you should at least have a firm lever with not too much travel in it.

If you start riding and the system needs pumping up again after traveling any distance then check for warped discs.

If everything works the way you want then enjoy it. The 6-pots can be a bugger to maintain, especially if you do a lot of wet-weather riding.

The next recommendation is a gixer (or Yamaha) front end with nice radial brakes. Its a useful improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok thanks for the tips, you say upgrade to a Gsxr front end, what all components are you referring to? Seems like this might be a common problem with these tillers. I see the caliper rebuild kits online, you think that might do it?
 

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It helps if you tap the caliper with a nylon hammer as it is being bled .Air bubbles can get stuck in the one place .
 

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It helps if you tap the caliper with a nylon hammer as it is being bled .Air bubbles can get stuck in the one place .
or keep pulling the lever and letting it slam back to the stop iff the air has got to the top..this needs to be done very fast
 
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