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Just fixed as mentioned at first post! Thanks for idia! I've used 1mm oil/petrol resistant sheet of rubber. Got top fueled and now tank is dry and clean, dont smells like a barrel of petrol :)
 

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Does anyone have pics or diagrams of how to connect the fuel pump. I'm trying to put the bike together. But not sure what house goes where
 

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1998 TLS; 2001 TLR; 200X TLRSF
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Discussion Starter #45
Update on this TLR fuel pump gasket mod:

OK, I am waaaay over due in posting these notes on the performance of this fuel pump gasket mod. My apologies. :coocoo It won't happen all in one sitting, but this is a start.

In short, the seal maintained its leak-free state for five years - from Dec, 2011 to Dec, 2016. However, the failure mode was a surprise.... or maybe not.

I could detect fuel fumes, and I noticed small accumulations of fuel residue on the bottom of the pump plate in Dec, 2016. Being the procrastinator I am, I didn't get around to inspecting and fixing it until May, 2017. When I removed the pump from the tank, I found the path of the fuel leak was between the bottom of the OEM gasket and the fuel pump plate. On the other hand, the seal between the OEM gasket, home made Viton gasket, and tank flange was tight and clean.

While it was difficult to photograph, the pictures below show the bottom side of the OEM gasket (it was new when installed in 2011). This is the surface that is pressed against the pump plate. Of course, this is the smaller (less prominent) neoprene lip, but it was completely flat with the steel substrate of the gasket. More importantly, the neoprene material was very hard with practically no flexibility left in it. I suspect this hardening is due to the additives in the gasoline here in the southwest USA.


20170529_154812 by Tony Six5, on Flickr

20170529_154731 by Tony Six5, on Flickr

20170529_154653 by Tony Six5, on Flickr

Given the stiffness of the hardened material, I'm not too surprised that a leak developed. And interestingly, the leak developed in December when the temperatures cool off here - and materials contract.

Also notable, is that the home-made Viton gasket on the tank side of the assembly was still very flexible and pliable. A slight impression could be seen where the taller neoprene lip had pressed into it, but the material was still very springy and dimensionally unchanged from five years ago. Nice.

So then, given this finding, I decided to add another Viton gasket to the 'bottom' of the OEM gasket. I also replaced the OEM gasket with a used one I had stashed years ago, but was still flexible. The new gasket arrangement would have the following stacked composition between the tank sealing flange and the pump plate.


  • Tank flange
  • 1/16" Viton gasket
  • Used, but flexible, OEM gasket
  • 1/16" Viton gasket
  • Fuel pump plate

New Viton base gasket against the pump plate.
20170529_152052 by Tony Six5, on Flickr

New stacked gasket arrangement.
20170529_152306 by Tony Six5, on Flickr

20170529_152253 by Tony Six5, on Flickr


This time around, I also used a sealant called Seal-All as an additional measure, since I don't like messing with this fuel leak issue, and it came highly recommended by others on the forum. I used a thin coating between each gasket layer. It was a little tricky to work with, since it seems to take a set quickly. Still, I managed to get things together.

I re-used the OEM pump plate screws with blue Loctite 243. Yes, there was very little initial engagement, but once the gaskets compressed, the threads were fully engaged in the bolt flange. Note, if your bolt flange threads are abused or partially stripped, then slightly longer screws may be needed to accommodate the extra thickness of these stacked gaskets.

I let it set for a day before adding fuel to the tank. Afterwards, there were no signs of a fuel leak, so I reassembled the TLR and it has been leak-free since then.

This brings the thread up to Dec, 2018, when the OEM fuel pump finally failed. I probably should have replaced it when the tank was open a year and a half ago. :banghead The pump degraded to the point where it developed only enough pressure to create a dribble of fuel through the pressure regulator and return line.

The new fuel pump installation will be my next update..... :)

:ytiller
 

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After temperatures of air decreased below the +10C Got noticed petrol smell again :( Seems like i should go your Six5 way.
 

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1998 TLS; 2001 TLR; 200X TLRSF
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Discussion Starter #47
After temperatures of air decreased below the +10C Got noticed petrol smell again :( Seems like i should go your Six5 way.
ego, this is certainly an option. However, lately there has been a lot of chatter about the "O-ring fix" for this seal on Facebook. While I haven't tried it personally, it has been getting good reviews, and it seems like a viable alternative.

Apparently, the Viton O-ring is available from Amazon.

Advantages of the o-ring versus this flat gasket mod are:
1) Easier to implement.
2) Less demand placed on the screw/thread interface.
 

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