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Discussion Starter #61
So when I drained the oil the first time the oil had small metal flakes. Kinda like a metal flake paint job. The valve covers seemed to be in good condition. And you say don't go farther than the bearings? What bearings would that be? I'm an amature to anything that is actually inside of the motor, like crank shaft,, rods, things like that
 

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Walking someone through Engine removal and repair over the internet would be nearly impossible. Your best bet is tearing the bike down as far as you're comfortable with and then asking additional questions as needed.

You'll need a ton of ziplock bags to store parts and keep everything organized.

NOTE: He's referring to Rod Bearings.


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Discussion Starter #66
I'm extremely good with remembering how things come off and go back on, should I pull the motor completely off the frame? Or that's not even a question its a must.
 

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Yes, motor has to come out of the frame. You'll need a front and rear tire stand to support the frame, a jack to support the motor, and a simple assortment of tools and supplies.

Ziplock bags (assortment of sizes)
Permanent markers
WD-40 x3 (because... duh)
Carb cleaner x3
Moly grease
Tub of Grease whipes x3
Shop towels x5
Screw drivers
Pliers
Vice Grips
Hammer
Breaker bar
Box wrenches
Torque wrenches
And a good socket set (6mm, 7mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 21mm, 27mm, 32mm)
I also highly recommend a torque drill and propane hand torch, but you may be able to get by without them.

The rear wheel has to come off in order to remove the chain from the drive sprocket. Technically you can keep the front tire on, but it makes dropping the motor a lot harder. I recommend you remove it.

Remove the tank, airbox, throttle bodies, Radiators, exhaust system, and all the hoses. The wire harness runs along the motor valley underneath everything, so engine block needs to be stripped bare in order to remove it.


And finally.... Take pictures of everything, and at multiple angles!!! I don't care how good you think your memory is you'll forget where shit goes a month later. Plus, those images will be worth a lot to the community later on down the road.

Keep all component assemblies together inside their own separate ziplock bags. For example, keep the pair valve assembly and all of its hoses, clamps, and screws together. Doing this will cut your project time in half.


Last but not least, keep in mind that you're about to tear into a 20+ year old bike. You're going to discover a lot of worn/broken stuff. You're going to break stuff along the way. So long as you're not trying to restore it to perfect OCD condition (like I did) you'll be fine, but otherwise be prepared to spend some serious $$ on replacement parts.




NOTE: I highly recommend reading the following threads in their entirety before getting started. Both are unique in that Clyde was restored with a blank check, while Bob was restored as cheaply as possible.

Resurrection of Clyde
Resurrection of Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Thanks man that really helps a lot. I really hope its not a shit ton wrong with it.. Wife says I have a limited amount of access to the bank card lol.. But we shall see I guess. Ima start by saving some $ on building the bike stands..
 

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The front stand you can get away with by using cement blocks (like I did with Clyde), but trying to do this without an actual rear stand is just asking for trouble. Bike needs to be elevated and stable.

Your first course of action should be determining where all that white smoke was coming from. I still say I hear a leaking header exhaust in that video, and white smoke seemed to be coming from the top of the engine block somewhere. If you damaged the engine when you drilled the header, then that's game over.
 

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From the vid you posted i would say you either threw a rod bearing or you have a broken lifter/bucket failure. Before you start a major rebuild project, check the oil pump screen. This means draining the coolant, removing the water pump impeller, and taking off the side cover under the clutch cover. If the screen is full of metal you then will know a full rebuild is in order. If the screen looks ok then time to check out the valve area. My 2 cents.
 

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should I pull the motor completely off the frame?t.
No.

I think bearings but it doesn't matter. Based on your descriptions, just in case, start by looking inside the clutch side engine cover then "inside" the valves covers as this gives you the opportunity to examine those areas (clutch/starter gears/valve train) just to rule them out before you do the harder task of removing the engine completely, which you will need to to get to the crank or gearbox.

Doing it this way, you win if you find something and maybe avoid dropping the engine, or you win as makes removing the various large nuts off easier, i.e drive chain is still on to lock the engine, (remember, don't need to separate the generator bolt) Easier to use an impact wrench either way.

Would strongly advise against doing yourself if no experience, And you remembering everything is asking for trouble! They are fairly easy as engines go, but that's if you have mechanical experience to draw on. a car mechanic buddy will have little trouble if follow the manual.

Note, done a few, and I find best way to remove engine, with bike on a rear bike stand, remove the oil filter and cooler, leave the lower rear mounting bolt in, with a floor jack, lower a little, remove drive chain, lower all the way to the floor where it will sit (on a piece of wood/old mat) This lines up that mounting bolt closely, making it easy to get out/back it the same way single handed.
 

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Rear wheel can stay on, just fully push forward to slacken chain/lift off sprocket. Front wheel stays on/to the ground. just need a rear wheel stand. 30 dollars?? If caught the bearings early enough, may have avoided journal damage. all it cost me was 60 odd dollars for 4 bearing shells. Do have crank journal measured properly with plastigauge ($10) before buying new shells.

I did give you the method of checking the rods without even doing any engine work other than taking out the spark plugs
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Checking the piston by pushing with a long screw driver right? Also I pulled the cover that you can see in the video off already.. Is that the clutch cover? Because when I did there wasn't anything odd inside.. There wasn't any metal shavings or anything.
 

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I have a lots of experience in the mechanical area, just never a motorcycle.
Look at the bright side... after this you'll be a pro 👊


Truth be told, if you've got shavings in your oil, then the engine is going to need to come out before you can do anything with it. Something in there is definitely chewed up, so no need to half-ass the process. Being mechanically inclined you already know that tearing stuff apart is easy compared to reassembly. Just take it one piece at a time. Get the engine up on a work bench and we'll take it from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Yea your right. I may as well take it out. Like others have said its an old bike and I'm sure its been rode hard. So I may as well replace most bearings and things of that sort that are fairly inexpensive. Is there and special tools that I will need other than sockets, combo wrenches, screw drivers, and Allan wrenches?
 
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