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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I recently purchased an 01 tl1000r and on my cluster I noticed there is no fuel display and the tac moves right to 4000 and stays once the key is on is it common to have a bad instrument cluster or is it more likely to be a connection or sensor problem mind you everything else on the cluster works speedo temp neutral hi beam turn signal gauge light thanks
 

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Roxanne,

Neither the S nor the R have a fuel gauge.

They have a fuel light bulb. It blinks when low and illuminates when really low. It's done via transistors in the fuel assembly.

As for the needle jumping to 4k. That's interesting. The cluster is controlled via the ECM. Maybe a wire is shorted to ground?

Hopefully @JoE. will chime in. To say he knows the instrument cluster is like saying Picasso can paint...
 

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Someone called?

They have a fuel light bulb. It blinks when low and illuminates when really low. It's done via transistors in the fuel assembly.
...it's done rather via thermistors not transistors :)

As for the needle jumping to 4k. That's interesting. The cluster is controlled via the ECM. Maybe a wire is shorted to ground?
To be honest, I don't have the foggiest idea. I once had a SRAD gauge cluster (which is pretty identical to the TLR one) where the needle jumped to ~3K once ignition was switched on. Turned out the needle had been removed at some point in time, and then reset to '0' with power off. However, that tach was still working, just always had 3k too much. Shorting a wire to GND could explain the tach not working at all, but not this jumping to 4k.

To say he knows the instrument cluster is like saying Picasso can paint...
I wish I would... Sorry.
 

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Thanks Jo...

And sorry about the thermistor incorrectness... :p
I knew that!!

Roxanne,

For people that aren't as smart as Jo (and that includes me...)

A thermistor is an inline resistor. It works by heating up and breaking (or closing). Similar to a thermostat with wax.

It has current running through it and normally stays cool enough submerged in fuel. But when it goes dry (the fuel is below the level) ... It heats up. Air has much less heat resistance than liquid.

Once it "pops" it completes a circuit. And this the light comes on.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you everyone I did some research and I too think it's likely a wiring issue there aftermarket blinkers and ground effects on it with a switch I plan to start there the guy used crappy connectors and in couple places none at all plan to work on it this weekend will post when I figure it out and thanks again 😊
 
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