Push Rod and Countershaft Seal Replacement (DRAFT) - Page 2
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Thread: Push Rod and Countershaft Seal Replacement (DRAFT)

  1. #11
    Platinum Subscriber JoshCampbell's Avatar
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    Found issue #1- Images are too damn big
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  2. #12
    Silver Subscriber Tuckshop Ted's Avatar
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    Red, the ONLY Colour.....for a 1997 TLS.....
    (1) Sold the old girl now ....... she will be missed...


    (2) UNO frame & swinger with 1040 Bimota (aka TLR) engine running 17x40 teeth, Hydraulic clutch conversion, Billet wndowed clutch cover & cut plate spinner, Dunlop tyres, PC3, TLS bodywork, GSXR750-TT forks with custom Wilbers springs etc, Nissin brake calipers all round, front ones radial, radial Nissin clutch & brake masters, GSXR1000 K5 clocks, PVM lightweight wheels, LED lights all round, Full Yoshi exhaust system, Carbon cans, Yoshi rearsets, K&N air filter, Wilbers custom rear shock, Custom paint job. Skidmarx bellypan, Low profile rear seat hump, MotoX bars, all round (literally) nice guy.

    (3) Bog standard BMW R1150RT.

    (4) Boxes of many parts waiting to be made into 2 more TLS's.

    Workshop in Welham Green near Hatfield in Hertfordshire - TEKMOTIVE - 01707 265000 - www.tekmotive.co.uk.

  3. #13
    AMA Pit Boss Six5's Avatar
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    Josh,
    Nice write up and great photos.
    It will come in handy for many of us. Please make it a sticky when you are done with it.

    In the meantime, I found this error.
    You call this the "camshaft position sensor" in both the dis-assembly and Reassembly sections. The item you are showing in the photo is actually the SPEEDOMETER Sensor.

    The camshaft position sensor is on top of the rear valve cover.

    Remove Camshaft Position Sensor using Allen Wrench #
    (Put bolt back in afterwards)
    January 2012 TLOTM & BBOTM


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  5. #14
    Platinum Subscriber JoshCampbell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Six5 View Post
    ...In the meantime, I found this error. You call this the "camshaft position sensor" ...is actually the SPEEDOMETER Sensor.
    Well this bit of info will prove useful while I'm troubleshooting my speedometer issue this weekend
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  6. #15
    Platinum Subscriber JoshCampbell's Avatar
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    NOTES:

    CORRECTION: Camshaft Position Sensor = Speedometer sensor
    CORRECTION: Resize images
    CORRECTION: Replace blurry images

    ADDITION: Any procedural differences between the R and S models
    ADDITION: Explanation on why part numbers listed are for SV1000
    ADDITION: Fairing Disassembly
    ADDITION: Tire reassembly (repack bearings, grease the axle, etc..)
    ADDITION: How to properly tighten and lube chain (explain dangers of over-tightening)
    ADDITION: Example image of your worn rear sprocket with broken teeth. Explain how retarded you felt when you thought it was a sheared gear going down the road. Include info for replacement (what was his name?)

    SUGGESTION: Flush hydraulic fluid (clutch)
    SUGGESTION: Check Brake pads- Replace if needed (will need tutorial)
    SUGGESTION: Check Air Filter- Replace if needed (will need tutorial)
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
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  7. #16
    Superbike Twin Pupsi's Avatar
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    Nice work!

    Some suggestions:
    There´s no need to take the rear wheel of. Just take of the nut and the chain adjuster plate from the rear axle, that gives you enough space to take the chain of.
    Put a cloth on the left end of the swing arm, so you can lay the chain on it without causing scratches.

    But first of all: Losen the nut from the drive shaft first. It´s easier when the chain hold´s the sprocket while the rear wheel is blocked. If there´s no impact wrench you can block the rear wheel with a wooden stick, wich is laying on both sides of the swing arm and holds a spoke in the middle.

    Use a hook to pull the seals out. Normally you have a hook to assemble the springs on the exhaust or the side stand.

  8. #17
    Platinum Subscriber JoshCampbell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pupsi View Post
    Nice work! ... There´s no need to take the rear wheel off. Just take of the nut and the chain adjuster plate from the rear axle, that gives you enough space to take the chain off...
    I spent a couple days mulling over whether or not to incorporate this into guide. While I always like to my guides to be as inclusive as possible (especially since some folks may not have a rear stand), I've decided to retain the wheel removal as the de facto standard for several reasons

    (1) More choices means more confusion. Those looking for this guide will likely be novices, like I was at the time, and so the best thing for them is a simple straight forward Do-This-And-Only-This type guide.

    (2) I tried removing the chain and drive sprocket without pulling the tire on my very first attempt and I couldn't do it. No to mention I busted all my knuckles up in the process. Since everything needs to be loosened anyway it's just easier to remove the hole thing. I do like your suggestion regarding using a piece of wood to lock the drive sprocket. It makes sense to keep it in neutral rather than placing sudden torque on the gears. Obviously this doesn't work without the rear tire, but I'm thinking a pair of vice grips on the chain might accomplish the same goal? I'm going to look into this one.

    (3) Removing the rear tire will give access to areas of the bike which typically get neglected (by the inexperienced, like I was). For example, cleaning the under tail, the chain pad, the area around the shock, etc.. Checking break pads or flushing brake lines. Repacking the rear tire bearings. Greasing the axle. Inspected the rear sprocket. Physically manipulated the chain to check for tight spots. etc. etc. etc. Even though the premise is to cover seal replacement, there's always room to seamlessly provide insight into other related areas without disrupting the natural flow of the guide. Additionally, it also allows other detailed tutorials, such as the charging mod or relay wire replacement, to be linked into a central information source. So while I don't go into detail on how to install a rear tire or replace a chain in this guide I do reference it, so in the future if someone is changing the seals and realizes they do need to change the tire they can simply link to that tutorial from this one. One stop shop. But to the point- All this potential knowledge and maintenance would be harder to sell to the reader if there were a tire blocking access to everything.


    I appreciate the feedback. Sorry for the rambling. I'm pretty passionate when it comes to documentation design. I absolutely HATE spending hours scouring the internet for bread crumbs of information. If you're going to teach something to someone... teach it all
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  9. #18
    Superbike Twin Pupsi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshCampbell
    I do like your suggestion regarding using a piece of wood to lock the drive sprocket. It makes sense to keep it in neutral rather than placing sudden torque on the gears. Obviously this doesn't work without the rear tire....
    That´s why i wrote "first of all: Loosen the nut from the drive shaft."

    Quote Originally Posted by JoshCampbell
    Removing the rear tire will give access to areas of the bike which typically get neglected (by the inexperienced, like I was). For example, cleaning the under tail, the chain pad, the area around the shock, etc.. Checking break pads or flushing brake lines. Repacking the rear tire bearings. Greasing the axle. Inspected the rear sprocket. Physically manipulated the chain to check for tight spots. etc. etc. etc.
    Absolutely right!
    This is the reason, why i took of the swing arm off every spring.
    I washed the chain, cleaned all the bearings of the rod and the swing arm th put fresh grease in. (astounding, how much dirt you will find there after only 12 months!!) So i was still going with the first bearings after more than 60.000mls. The chains always lasts for about 20.000mls.

  10. #19
    Platinum Subscriber JoshCampbell's Avatar
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    Hey all my images are restored. Yippee!!
    geofftl1000r likes this.
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